Applications Still Being Accepted for Study Abroad in Germany

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Category: International Law & Diplomacy, Marquette Law School, Public
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csm_Teaser_SuSch_01_17bc017384

 

There is still time to join law students from Wisconsin, throughout the United States, and around the world as they come together in Giessen, Germany from July 16 to August 13, 2016 for the Eighth Annual Summer Session in International and Comparative Law. The program already has the minimum number of participants necessary to move forward, but additional participants are welcome and applications will continue to be accepted until May 27.

The faculty includes Marquette Law School’s own Professor Ed Fallone and Adjunct Professor Doug Smith, as well as Professor Heinz Klug from the University of Wisconsin Law School, Professor Thilo Marauhn of the Justus Liebig University in Giessen, Germany, and Professor Sorcha MacLeod of the University of Sheffield in the United Kingdom.

Participants can choose two classes from the following four courses: 1) Comparative Constitutional Law: The E.U., Germany and the U.S.; 2) International Economic Law & Business Transactions; 3) Business Ethics and Human Rights Law; and 4) Comparative Corporate Governance. The schedule includes field trips to Berlin and Hamburg, as well as free time to travel Europe on your own.

Applications can be downloaded from the “Study Abroad” link on the Marquette Law School webpage. Interested students from Marquette or other ABA accredited law schools should contact Prof. Ed Fallone at edward.fallone@marquette.edu for more information.

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Baseball Diplomacy

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It has been great fun to watch President Obama in Cuba (and to get to say things like–hey, I was there!) over the last two days.  The one thing we did not get to do on our trip was attend a baseball game since we were rained out twice.  Sigh.  But we did talk about the potential impact of baseball exchanges on the economy and there is no question that both Cuban baseball and obama-cuba-baseball-300x229Major League Baseball will have much to discuss as the thaw continues.  Funnily, I was interviewed on Monday by a Swiss journalist–newspaper article here–about the impact of baseball based on my 2001 article called Baseball Diplomacy examining the controversy back then over the Baltimore Orioles playing a game in Cuba in 1999.  In what now seems like ancient history, I wrote about the Elian Gonzales affair, the Helms-Burton act, and, more pertinently to baseball, the economics of playing baseball in Cuba.  I also discussed how Cuban players are treated when they arrive in the U.S. depending on whether they come directly or via a third country.  I imagine that all of these rules will be updated and changing in the next few years.  And it will be fascinating to watch.  Here’s looking forward to more baseball in both directions!

 

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Now We Can All Go To Cuba!

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(cross-posted from www.indisputably.org)

Well not really, but soon.  cuba-seminary-front-green-car-e1453233240472Today the government announced that U.S. airlines can propose routes to Cuba which could then start flying later this year.  The President has also announced that he hopes to get to Cuba sometime this spring as well.  Even the New York Times at the end of January has helpfully posted a column on Frequently Asked Questions about travel to Cuba.

For more reasons on why this would be fascinating for all of us interested in conflict,  I am linking to the (last) bit of press coverage from our trip.  Here are students talking to the Marquette paper about the trip and here is a television interview conducted by our local station.  Enjoy!

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A Cuban Perspective on International Law

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As a member of the group of students and faculty who recently visited Cuba, I want to concur in all of the prior posts that expressed how fascinating it was to tour Havana, learn about some of the history, and in particular interact with the people. Prior to the trip, my only encounters with socialists had taken place in Berkeley, California and Eugene, Oregon, so I’d always associated the ideology with Left Coast stuff like patchouli and hemp shoulder bags. This was my first opportunity to meet and talk with genuine, born-and-raised socialists–people who think of Marx and Engels the way we might think of Locke or Smith. One of those people was Celeste Pino Canales, a professor of public international law at the University of Havana, who spoke with us about Cuban perspectives on international law and, afterward, allowed me to interview her on what it’s like to be a law professor in Cuba. A post about our conversation is available here.

 

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Cuba – Do They Like Us?

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(cross-posted from www.indisputably.org)

Since returning, I’ve received calls from those about to go and questions from others—what are the Cuban people like?  And what do they think of Americans?

The official Cuban policy, of course, is that the US policy has been shortsighted and narrow minded.  And the list of US policies that need to change was also outlined for us:

  • end the embargo
  • stop treating Cuban immigrants to the US differently from other immigrants (granting them refugee status when no other national group is and thereby encouraging them to leave)
  • leave Guantanamo Bay–what lease lasts over 100 years!?!
  • and stop broadcasting US propaganda from Radio Marti.

Museo_de_la_Revolucion-Rincon_de_los_cretinos_Batista_Reagan_G._Bush_W._BushAnd one can definitely see anti-American sentiment in the Museum of the Revolution in a very funny little exhibit called the Rincon de los Cretinos(the Corner of Idiots).

But those are the official sentiments, and not at all what one hears around and about.  According to the American journalist, Mark Frank, who spoke to us, there has not been any anti-US demonstrations in a decade.  And I did not see any billboards or posters that were anti-US (other than the historic exhibits in the Museum).  Most importantly, each student noted how individually friendly the Cubans were.

Read more »

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Cuba — Economic Challenges

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For the blog today, I thought I would incorporate some of the student reflections about one of our first speakers.  We had a terrific briefing on the economy from Guilio Ricci, an economics professor at the University of Havana.

From Max Rabkin:

Spending a week in Havana was an eye-opening experience for many reasons. I expected good food, friendly people and time-capsule-like architecture, and was not disappointed with any of those. However, I was most intrigued with how the country and the Castro government was handling the introduction of market reforms and resuming diplomatic relations with the United States.

Most fascinating was the talk with the economist from the University of Havana. I went into the trip expecting a heavy dose of Marxist-Leninist thought to permeate every discussion the group had, and although this was generally true, the economic lecture ended up being one of the fairest and provided the most realistic outlook for the Cuban economy and future enterprise prospects for the public.  Read more »

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Cuba- The Spanish-Cuban-American War – Who Knew?

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(cross-posted from www.indisputably.org)

On our very first night in Cuba, we went to dinner at the famous Hotel Nacional.  The Hotel is gorgeous on a bluff overlooking the water, old, majestic, and impressive.  Here is a picture of all of us in the ballroom.  Everyone famous who has visited Cuba, comes to the Hotel and there are even pictures all around of the famous visitors (including a larger than life portrait of Hugo Chavez, not something that we are going to see here in the U.S.)  But the thing that really struck me was in the garden next to several old cannons.
(And here is a picture from the garden.)Cuba-hotel nacional

In commemoration of a battle, the plaque referred to the Spanish-Cuban-American War.  I knew of no such thing. Read more »

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Cuba – Yes The Cars Are Amazing

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(Cross-posted from www.indisputably.org)

cuba-seminary-front-green-car-e1453233240472So we all returned safely home this weekend and I look forward to blogging soon.  Truly an amazing trip of contradictions–gorgeous old cars and baroque buildings mixed with decrepit infrastructure.  Total candor on economic and planning needs and nothing on any political change…ever.  Just fascinating.  Much more to come but, given the first day of classes today, here’s a start of the pictures of the beautiful cars.  (Ed. note: click “Read More” for additional photos). Read more »

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Courses Announced for 2016 Summer Session in Giessen, Germany

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LD7_9975Courses have been announced for the 8th Annual Summer Session in International and Comparative Law, to take place in Giessen, Germany from July 15 through August 13, 2016.

Participants will have the choice of two, 2 credit courses from the following:

  1. Comparative Law
  2. International Economic Law and Business Transactions
  3. Comparative Corporate Governance
  4. Business Ethics and Human Rights

All classes take place at the Justus Liebig University School of Law in Giessen, Germany, and are taught by an international faculty.  Students from Marquette University Law School, the University of Wisconsin Law School, and other U.S. law schools attend classes alongside international law students from across the globe.

More details, and an application, will be available soon on the Law School website.  In the meantime, information sessions for interested students have been scheduled for Thursday September 24 at 12 pm (Room 263) and 5 pm (Room 357).  The information sessions will also discuss the Law School’s Semester Exchange Programs for Copenhagen, Madrid and Poitiers, France.

Giessen 2015

Photos: (top) students attend the 2014 Summer Session in Giessen; (below) students attend the 2015 Summer Session

 

 

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New Article on Federal Courts and Customary International Law

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I just posted a draft of a new article that studies citations in published judicial opinions to evaluate how federal courts go about ascertaining customary international law. For those interested, it’s forthcoming in the Iowa Law Review and available here.

Special thanks to Alex DeGuire and Ami Regele for excellent research assistance.

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Law School to Sponsor Cuba Trip

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TR_San_Juan_Hill_1898This coming January 9-16, 2016, several Marquette Law School faculty and I will accompany a group of law students for an International Conflict Resolution winter break trip to Cuba.   The trip will focus on economic, religious, social and political issues during this interesting time as Cuba and the US begin renewing diplomatic relations.  The itinerary will include meetings with journalists, leaders of the Catholic church, urban planners, economics experts, a former Cuban diplomat, lawyers and university students.    Participants will also experience traditional Cuban cuisine, tour Havana and learn about the Cuban baseball program.

An application, and more information, can be found by clicking this link.

Space is limited, and priority will be given to 3L students and to students with international travel experience.  Please note, this is NOT a class and no course credit will be given!!

This trip is yet another opportunity for Marquette University Law School students to travel to a foreign country in order to observe issues relating to international conflict resolution first hand, while interacting personally with local leaders.  The Law School also offers a class on International Conflict Resolution on a biennial basis that includes a trip to Israel.

Photo:  Teddy Roosevelt and the Rough Riders in Cuba in 1898.

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Schnitzel, Beer, and Marketing Your Study Abroad Experience

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Classroom at Justus Liebig UniversityThis past summer I was fortunate to have had the opportunity to participate in Marquette University Law School’s summer program in Giessen, Germany.  The program, run jointly with the University of Wisconsin Law School and Justus Liebig University in Giessen, provides Marquette students with the opportunity to study a variety of international law topics at a foreign university with classmates from around the globe.  Course offerings this past summer included Comparative Law, International Economic Law & Business Transactions, International Intellectual Property Law, and the Law of Armed Conflict.  The courses were taught by both American and German professors over the course of a (somewhat intense) four week period that included weekend excursions to Munich and Berlin.  While the subject matter of the classes was incredibly interesting, this was further magnified by the international make-up of the student body.  My classmates this past summer hailed from 17 different countries including the United States Mexico, Brazil, Peru, Germany, Spain, Moldova, Turkey, India, Sri Lanka, Vietnam, South Korea, China, Benin, Senegal, Cameroon, and Ethiopia.  The discussions and conversations we had, both in and out of the classroom, provided insights about international legal issues that would be difficult to duplicate outside of such an experience. Not only was I able to learn about international, German, and EU law, but I was also able to gain a better understanding of US law.

The value of a study abroad experience, both in terms of the substantive knowledge gained as well as the “soft” skills developed, is likely to be clear to someone who teaches or participates in such a program (see Professor Fallone’s semi-exhaustive list of ten reasons why one should study abroad).  However, those less familiar with international study experiences may not always ascribe the same value or benefit to study abroad programs.  This can be problematic for law students who hope to show potential employers that their time spent studying overseas was more than just an excuse to sample copious amounts of schnitzel and beer.   While CALI awards, clerkships, internships, pro bono work, and participation in law review or moot court are all ways that students have traditionally distinguished themselves to potential employers, the same has not been true for participation in study abroad programs, which are a relatively new phenomena in the law school curriculum. Read more »

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