2011 News

  • 09.07.11
    Faculty & Staff
    JS Online
    Peter Rofes, a Marquette University law professor, said doing so might discourage a candid exchange of ideas by members of the court. In some cases, he said, a justice might also feel "boxed in" by their own earlier comments if their thinking on a case evolves over the course of the justices' work on a decision. Rofes noted that the altercation between Prosser and Bradley didn't occur at a scheduled conference but instead during an informal discussion between the justices.
  • 09.01.11
    Faculty & Staff
    WTAG.com
    Former Justice Janine Geske told the State Journal that Gableman’s claim and the denials were “bizarre” and “disturbing.” Geske, who’s now a Marquette law professor, said she’s known Bradley for 20 years – and she can’t imagine her hitting another justice in anger because Gableman called Abrahamson by her first name. She said that even the court’s custodial staff called her Shirley.
  • 09.01.11
    Faculty & Staff
    Media Matters for America
    Labor Law Professor Secunda: Complaint Against Boeing Shows The NLRB Is "Carrying Out Its Congressionally Mandated Mission To Protect The Right Of Workers To Engage In Concerted Activity." From a Seattle Times editorial by Marquette University Law School associate professor Paul Secunda:
  • 09.01.11
    Faculty & Staff
    LaCrosseTribune.com
    Former Supreme Court Justice Janine Geske called the contradiction between Gableman's account and the denials by the three justices "disturbing" and the account itself "bizarre." "I have known Justice Bradley for 20 years. I cannot imagine her hitting another justice in anger because he (Gableman) called Justice Abrahamson ‘Shirley' - because everybody calls her Shirley," said Geske, adding that even the custodial staff at the court refers to the chief justice by her first name.
  • 08.29.11
    Faculty & Staff
    Marquette Tribune
    Janine Geske, distinguished professor of law at Marquette and former Wisconsin Supreme Court Justice, chaired a task force of campus and community members that focused on improving sexual misconduct policies. The group sought to improve communication about such incidents and raise awareness of existing resources available to the Marquette community. “I think (the alleged incidents) brought to light the gaps in how Marquette approached things,” Geske said.
  • 08.26.11
    Faculty & Staff
    JS Online
    "He's got himself in extremely deep, hot water," said Ralph Anzivino, a Marquette University law professor who specializes in bankruptcy law. In fact, Anzivino said he seriously doubts the bankruptcy judge will simply dismiss the case, despite Bonds' request that the judge do just that. The judge will likely ask that the School Board chief provide a full explanation for the problems and discrepancies in his filing, said the law professor.
  • 08.26.11
    Faculty & Staff
    JS Online
    Janine Geske, who became a Marquette University law professor after leaving the court, said Friday that she thought the court will improve its relations going forward. That's in spite of the hurt justices might feel from reading each other's interviews with detectives and having their problems become so public, she said. Geske said that conflict will always exist on an appellate court and that it doesn't have to make court a dysfunctional, though it can leave that impression. She emphasized how important that impression can be.
  • 08.26.11
    Faculty & Staff
    WISN.com
    Chad Oldfather, associate professor of law, said police reports regarding the incident offer a rare glimpse inside the current court. Story aired on WISN-TV
  • 08.20.11
    Faculty & Staff
    JS Online
    But hope is a good thing. The personality of Milwaukee has such strong elements of resistance to change and that-won't-succeed thinking that sometimes we don't accomplish doable things. Maybe it's time to let hard-driving optimists like Abby Ramirez go at our needs. Maybe she'll pitch a no-hitter. Maybe the rocket ship will fly.
  • 08.20.11
    Faculty & Staff
    Philadelphia Inquirer
    ormer Sen. Russ Feingold says he won't be a candidate for political office next year, taking himself out of the running in 2012 for either U.S. senator or governor of Wisconsin in the event Democrats force a recall election against Republican Gov. Scott Walker. Feingold, a Democrat, called it a difficult decision but said he wanted to teach full time at Marquette Law School, finish writing a book, and lead the political committee he founded, Progressives United. "While I may seek elective office again someday, I have decided not to run for public office during 2012," he...