2011 News

  • 12.22.11
    Faculty & Staff
    Isthmus
    Just in time for the 2012 election season, a new polling program is set to debut at Marquette Law School, and it promises to take the pulse of Wisconsin voters frequently and thoroughly. Charles Franklin, whose polling expertise and political acumen have made him the go-to-guy for electoral commentary, is taking a year-long leave from UW-Madison's political science department to head up the effort, which Marquette is billing as the "largest independent polling project in state history to study voter attitudes." Franklin, co-founder of Pollster.com and a former co-director...
  • 12.13.11
    Faculty & Staff
    JS Online
    Ed Fallone, a Marquette University law professor who has blogged about the issue, noted that in a 2008 case, Crawford v. Marion County Election Board, the U.S. Supreme Court had upheld Indiana's photo ID law but left open a possibility that such laws might be successfully challenged if they were unfairly applied. Fallone said that he doubted Wisconsin's entire law would be struck down but that the lawsuit might succeed at least in part if statistics can show larger numbers of people would be affected.
  • 12.07.11
    Faculty & Staff
    OregonLive.com
  • 12.03.11
    Faculty & Staff
    ThinkProgress
    Marquette University Law School prof. Edward Fallone told the Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel that he’s “skeptical about charging people to express their First Amendment opinion. … You can’t really put a price tag on the First Amendment.”
  • 12.02.11
    Faculty & Staff
    Wisconsin Radio Network
    Marquette University law school professor Ed Fallone sees a problem there. “To have to pony up a large amount of money in advance, that really does chill the ability of groups and organizations to hold the demonstration in the first place,” said Fallone, who expects a legal challenge to that provision.
  • 12.02.11
    Faculty & Staff
    The Huffington Post
    Edward Fallone, an associate professor at Marquette University Law School, told the Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel that the policy could be problematic since some groups might not be able to afford the costs. "I'm a little skeptical about charging people to express their First Amendment opinion," he said. "You can't really put a price tag on the First Amendment."
  • 12.01.11
    Faculty & Staff
    LexisNexis
  • 12.01.11
    Faculty & Staff
    Chicago Tribune - Busines
    "I like the way Posner calls out bad lawyering," said Michael O'Hear, a Marquette University law professor who is a close observer of the 7th Circuit. "I think that the judiciary is a little too chummy with the bar and a little too quick to look the other way when lawyers mess up." But in this instance O'Hear said Posner went too far in his criticism. "It's one thing to be critical and another to make him a laughingstock," he said.
  • 12.01.11
    Faculty & Staff
    JS Online
    During the protests, the administration tightly restricted access to the Capitol, prompting a lawsuit from unions seeking to reopen it. Peg Lautenschlager, a former Democratic state attorney general and the attorney for the unions involved in that case, said she couldn't yet comment because she was still reviewing the policy. But Edward Fallone, an associate professor at Marquette University Law School, said the possibility of charging demonstrators for police costs might be problematic because some groups might not be able to afford to pay. "I'm a little skeptical about...
  • 11.29.11
    Faculty & Staff
    JS Online
    Under Joseph Kearney, Marquette’s law school is becoming Milwaukee’s public square, where people of different political outlooks can come together and hash out the issues of the day.