Clinics, Judicial Internships, and Supervised Fieldwork Programs

Updated April 2005

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INTRODUCTION

Marquette University Law School offers an upper level curriculum that is both rich and diverse in its offerings. Its components include traditional classroom courses, seminars, workshops, perspectives and advanced legal research courses, clinics and internships, directed studies, laws reviews and moot courts, etc., each contributing in its own way to each student's legal education and formation as a lawyer.

A significant component of the curriculum is the segment which is known as "Clinics, Judicial Internships and Supervised Fieldwork Programs." This component has long been a part of the Marquette curriculum and takes advantage of the Law School's proximity to and relationship with the courts, prosecution and defense agencies, and a host of other governmental and public service legal agencies. Each program is different and each offers its participants a different kind of experiential learning. Several provide an opportunity for students to participate in rendering service to the poor - an opportunity which advances the mission of a Jesuit law school.

The Law School sponsors four live-client clinical programs: (1) the Marquette Mediation Clinic, (2) the Prosecutor Clinic, which is operated in cooperation with the Milwaukee County District Attorney's Office, (3) the Public Defender Clinic, which is affiliated with the Milwaukee office of the Wisconsin State Public Defender, and (4) the Unemployment Compensation Clinic, which is linked with Legal Action of Wisconsin, Inc.

The Law School also sponsors a judicial internship program. Two separate offerings are available in this category: (1) an appellate internship in which students clerk with either a judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit who has a local chambers, a justice of the Wisconsin Supreme Court with chambers in Madison, or a judge of the Wisconsin Court of Appeals with chambers either in Milwaukee or in nearby Waukesha; and (2) a trial court internship in which students clerk with either a judge of the Milwaukee County Circuit Court, a judge of the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Wisconsin, a United States Magistrate Judge for the Eastern District of Wisconsin, or a United States Bankruptcy Judge.

Finally, the Law School sponsors what it calls supervised fieldwork programs. In these programs a student may intern with one of a number of government agencies or public interest organizations that offer legal services.

Each of the programs described in this Curricular Plan made its way into the curriculum by virtue of faculty action. This includes review by the Curriculum Committee and the faculty as a whole. In addition, to assure that students are academically prepared for a clinic, judicial internship or supervised fieldwork experience and to further assure that these programs are properly integrated into the overall law school curriculum, the faculty has approved a comprehensive set of prerequisite courses of study that relate to the subject matter of the fieldwork.

SUPERVISION OF THE PROGRAM

It is the responsibility of the Director of Clinical Education, acting on behalf of the faculty and working in cooperation with numerous full-time and adjunct faculty members, to oversee these programs and to monitor the quality of the education students derive from them. The Director himself is a tenured member of the full-time faculty.

Substantial measures are in place to assure the educational quality of each placement in the clinics, judicial internships and supervised fieldwork programs. These include the provision of detailed instructions to the judges and attorneys who supervise students at the field placements, the submission of time and activity journals by the students that are approved by their field supervisors and reviewed by the Director of Clinical Education, the submission of program evaluations by the students, the submission of student performance evaluations by field supervisors, student attendance at weekly classroom components that are taught by full-time or adjunct faculty for those enrolled in the clinics and judicial internships, and attendance by students participating the supervised fieldwork program at periodic meetings with full-time faculty members who assist in the oversight of the supervised fieldwork program.

The Director of Clinical Education confers regularly with the adjunct faculty who teach the classroom component of the clinics and he himself teaches the classroom component of the judicial internship program. The Director also maintains regular contact with the agency lawyers who supervise students in the supervised fieldwork program and conducts periodic site visitations at the offices where supervised fieldwork occurs.

CLINICS, JUDICIAL INTERNSHIPS AND SUPERVISED FIELDWORK PROGRAMS


OUTLINE OF PROGRAM STRUCTURE

The following summary chart depicts the structure of Marquette's clinics, judicial internships and supervised fieldwork programs:

  1. CLINICS
    1. Mediation Clinic (in-house)
    2. Prosecutor Clinic
    3. Public Defender Clinic
    4. Unemployment Compensation Clinic
  2. JUDICIAL INTERNSHIP PROGRAMS

    1. Appellate Courts
      1. United States Court of Appeals for the 7th Circuit (Hon. John L. Coffey and Hon. Diane S. Sykes)
      2. Wisconsin Supreme Court (all seven justices)
      3. Wisconsin Court of Appeals - District I (three judges)
      4. Wisconsin Court of Appeals - District II (four judges)
    2. Trial Courts
      1. United States District Court for the Eastern District of Wisconsin (three judges)
      2. United States Magistrate Courts for the Eastern District of Wisconsin (three judges)
      3. United States Bankruptcy Court for the Eastern District of Wisconsin (one judge)
      4. Milwaukee County Circuit Courts (numerous judges)
        1. Civil Division
        2. Family Division
        3. Felony Division
        4. Misdemeanor Division
        5. Children's Division

  3. SUPERVISED FIELDWORK PROGRAMS

    1. AIDS Resource Center
    2. Catholic Charities Immigration Assistance Project
    3. Centro Legal Por Derechos Humanos
    4. District Attorney Offices
    5. Federal Defender for the Eastern District of Wisconsin
    6. Internal Revenue Service
    7. Legal Action of Wisconsin, Inc.
    8. Legal Aid Society of Milwaukee
    9. Marquette University Law School Restorative Justice Initiative
    10. Midwest Environmental Advocates
    11. Milwaukee County District Attorney Restorative Justice Program
    12. National Labor Relations Board
    13. United States Attorney for the Eastern District of Wisconsin
    14. United States Dep't of Agriculture Office of General Counsel
    15. United States Equal Employment Opportunity Commission
    16. Wisconsin Dep't of Justice Criminal Appeals Unit
    17. Wisconsin Dep't of Justice Legal Services Division
    18. Wisconsin Dep't of Natural Resources Bureau of Legal Services
    19. Wisconsin Dep't of Workforce Development Equal Rights Division


CLINICS

MEDIATION CLINIC

In the Small Claims Pro Se Litigant Mediation Clinic, second and third-year law students mediate actual civil cases in the Milwaukee County Circuit Court Small Claims Division. Under the supervision of an experienced mediator, students serve as third party neutrals in real cases in which the parties are not represented by counsel.

The clinic is directed by Marquette University Law School Distinguished Professor Janine P. Geske, a former Justice of the Wisconsin Supreme Court. The clinic meets every Monday morning from 9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. in the Milwaukee County Courthouse.

The mediation clinical experience gives students the opportunity to develop listening and problem-solving skills as well as the opportunity to work directly with persons facing a variety of legal, social, and economic problems. Students also gain experience in handling difficult parties in a mediation setting. The clinic is designed to advance Marquette University's Jesuit mission of service to those in need by assisting those who are struggling without professional representation in court.

Supervisor: Professor Janine P. Geske.

Graded: Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory.

Frequency of Program: Offered each semester (including summers).

Placements Available: 8 per semester.

Prerequisites for Admission: Limited to students who have completed 27 credits.

This course may be taken for a second time with the permission of Professor Geske. A student will earn 2 credits if s/he has previously taken Law 560 ("Workshop in Dispute Resolution") or if s/he is taking this course for a second time. If a student has neither taken Law 560 nor has taken this course in any prior semester, the student will earn 3 credits and must participate in a weekend of mediation training at the beginning of the semester.

PROSECUTOR CLINIC

The Prosecutor Clinic is a Marquette University Law School program operated in cooperation with the Milwaukee County District Attorney's Office. Ever since the early 1970's, when funding was available through grants from the federal Law Enforcement Assistance Administration, the Law School has offered its students an opportunity to participate in this clinical program at the local state prosecutor's office.

The Prosecutor Clinic is supervised by the Director of Clinical Education and by a veteran member of the adjunct faculty who teaches the classroom component of the course and who serves as Chief Deputy District Attorney at the Milwaukee County District Attorney's Office. At the field site student interns are teamed with Assistant District Attorneys ("cooperating attorneys") who handle both felony and misdemeanor caseloads, including some specialty caseloads including homicide, drugs, sexual assault, and domestic violence.

CLINIC DESIGN

  1. Definitions
    1. The "Prosecutor Clinic" is a law school program operated in cooperation with the Milwaukee County District Attorney's Office for which credit is awarded and which is composed of both an academic component and a fieldwork component (as described below).
    2. The "supervising attorney" is a deputy district attorney or an assistant district attorney who is also a member of the law school adjunct faculty and who serves as general supervisor of the fieldwork component and teaches the academic component of the clinical course.
    3. The "cooperating attorneys" are the assistant district attorneys who provide the individualized supervision of the fieldwork performed by the students under the direction of the supervising attorney.
    4. The "director of clinical education" is the member of the full-time law school faculty who oversees the Prosecutor Clinic.
  2. Statement of Course Purpose and Goals

    The Prosecutor Clinic is an elective offering, which consists of an academic component and a fieldwork component. Both aspects of the course are designed to complement each other so as to broaden the students' understanding of criminal law and procedure and to develop specific lawyering skills. Those skills are identified as encompassing effective written and oral advocacy; the techniques for preparing and trying lawsuits; the drafting of legal documents; interviewing, negotiating and counseling; and the application of the rules of professional conduct.

  3. Duties and Responsibilities
    1. Supervising Attorney
      1. Teaches the classroom component of the Prosecutor Clinic.
      2. Supervises the fieldwork component at the District Attorney's office, including the following:
        1. Makes student fieldwork assignments;
        2. Conducts an orientation program for students at the field site;
        3. Maintains regular contact with the director of clinical education and with the cooperating attorneys;
        4. Conducts periodic review of student fieldwork performance; and
        5. Conducts individualized performance reviews with the students for purposes of guidance, counseling and evaluation.
      3. Conducts a final evaluation of each student and assigns a course grade.
    2. Cooperating Attorney
      1. Assumes personal professional responsibility for work undertaken by the student under his/her supervision.
      2. Provides direct supervision of all work performed by the student under the Wisconsin Supreme Court Student Practice Rule.
      3. Critiques the work of the student intern which he/she has supervised.
      4. Reads, signs and approves all legal documents prepared by the student.
      5. Reviews and approves bi-weekly time and activity logs submitted by the intern assigned to him/her.
      6. Maintains continual contact with the supervising attorney regarding student practice activities.
    3. Director of Clinical Education
      1. Generally oversees the operation of the Prosecutor Clinic.
      2. Assists the supervising attorney in developing the academic component of the course.
      3. Provides faculty assistance and guidance to the supervising attorney in the areas of educational techniques, student evaluations, fieldwork assignments, etc.
      4. Confers regularly with the supervising attorney to ensure that the goals and purposes of the course are being achieved.
      5. Conducts site visits at the fieldwork site.
      6. Maintains the official law school records on the operation of the Prosecutor Clinic.
  4. Field Work Component -- Description of Student Practice in the Prosecutor Clinic
    1. Students engage in those activities authorized under Wisconsin Supreme Court Rule SCR 50.06 of the Rules for the Practical Training of Law Students. The terms and conditions of those rules govern student practice in the Prosecutor Clinic.
    2. Students represent the State of Wisconsin under supervision (see SCR Rules 50.05 and 50.06) in the following activities:
      1. Criminal charging conferences
      2. Initial appearances in criminal court
      3. Felony preliminary examinations
      4. Arraignments
      5. Evidentiary and non-evidentiary motions
      6. Pre-trial conferences
      7. Trials (both jury trials and trials to the court)
      8. Sentencing
  5. Academic Component
    1. The academic component is taught in a classroom setting at the Law School and is designed to broaden the students' understanding of substantive law and procedure, to integrate this knowledge with its application in the field, and to develop the specific lawyering skills identified in the statement of course purpose. (See sec. II above).
    2. Course content of the academic component includes a study of the law, the ethics and the strategies involved in the following prosecutor functions:
      1. Case investigation
      2. The charging decision and the drafting of pleadings
      3. Representing the state at initial appearances, preliminary hearings and arraignments
      4. Conducting pretrial discovery
      5. Plea negotiating
      6. Criminal motion practice
      7. Criminal trial procedure
      8. Sentencing
  6. Evaluation of Student Performance
    1. Evaluation and grade assignment are the responsibility of the supervising attorney.
    2. A letter grade (A, AB, B, BC, C, D or F) is used to evaluate student performance.
    3. The course grade is based upon an evaluation of the totality of student performance in both components of the Prosecutor Clinic. This includes an assessment of each student's substantive knowledge, practice skills, written work product, and personal effort and initiative.
  7. Hours, Credits and Prerequisites
    1. The Prosecutor Clinic is offered once annually. It is two semesters in duration, commencing in August and concluding in May. No credit is earned unless the student completes both semesters of the program.
    2. Credit Hours: 6 (3 for the fall semester & 3 for the spring semester).
    3. Time Commitment: 360 hours (including time in class) evenly distributed over the course of two semesters.
    4. Classroom Hours: The Prosecutor Clinic class meets weekly for a minimum of two hours.
    5. Prerequisites
      1. Only those students who qualify for student Practice under the Rules for the Practical Training of Law Students (SCR 50.03) may enroll in the Prosecutor Clinic.
      2. Each student must have completed the following courses in order to enroll in the Prosecutor Clinic: Criminal Law, Criminal Process, Evidence, and Law and Ethics of Lawyering.
  8. Selection of Students and Course Enrollment
    1. Students are selected for participation in the Prosecutor Clinic by the supervising attorney and the director of clinical education.
    2. Enrollment is limited to 12 students (unless otherwise approved by the director of clinical education).

DEFENDER CLINIC

The Defender Clinic is a Marquette University Law School program operated in cooperation with the Milwaukee Office of the Wisconsin State Public Defender. This program has long been a part of the Law School's clinical offerings. Except for a brief period in the early 1980's, the Defender Clinic has afforded law students an opportunity to participate in a criminal defense internship for over twenty-five years.

The Defender Clinic is supervised by the Director of Clinical Education and by two members of the adjunct faculty. The latter teach the classroom component of the course. One of the adjunct professors serves in a top management capacity at the Milwaukee Office of the Wisconsin State Public Defender; the other is a veteran member of the agency. At the field site student interns are teamed with Assistant State Public Defenders ("cooperating attorneys") who handle both felony and misdemeanor caseloads.

CLINIC DESIGN

  1. Definitions
    1. The "Defender Clinic" is a law school program operated in cooperation with the Office of the Wisconsin State Public Defender for which credit is awarded and which is composed of both an academic component and a fieldwork component (as described below).
    2. The "supervising attorney" is an assistant state public defender who is also a member of the law school adjunct faculty and who serves as general supervisor of the fieldwork component and teaches the academic component of the clinical course.
    3. The "cooperating attorneys" are the assistant state public defenders who provide the individualized supervision of the fieldwork performed under the direction of the supervising attorney.
    4. The "director of clinical education" is the member of the full-time law school faculty who oversees the Defender Clinic.
  2. Statement of Course Purpose and Goals

    The Defender Clinic is an elective offering, which consists of an academic component and a fieldwork component. Both aspects of the course are designed to complement each other so as to broaden the students' understanding of criminal law and procedure and to develop specific lawyering skills. Those skills are identified as encompassing effective written and oral advocacy; the techniques for preparing and trying lawsuits; the drafting of legal documents; interviewing, negotiating and counseling; and the application of the rules of professional conduct.

  3. Duties and Responsibilities
    1. Supervising Attorney
      1. Teaches the academic component in the Defender Clinic.
      2. Supervises the fieldwork component at the Office of the Wisconsin State Public Defender, including the following:
        1. Makes student fieldwork assignments;
        2. Conducts an orientation program for students at the field site;
        3. Maintains regular contact with the director of clinical education and with the cooperating attorneys;
        4. Conducts periodic review of student fieldwork performance; and
        5. Conducts individualized performance reviews with the students for purposes of guidance, counseling and evaluation.
      3. Conducts a final evaluation of each student and assigns a course grade.
    2. Cooperating Attorney
      1. Assumes personal professional responsibility for work undertaken by the student under his/her supervision.
      2. Provides direct supervision of all work performed by the student under the Wisconsin Supreme Court Student Practice Rule.
      3. Critiques the performance of the student which he/she has supervised.
      4. Reads, signs and approves all legal documents prepared by the student.
      5. Maintains regular contact with the supervising attorney regarding student practice activities.
    3. Director of Clinical Education
      1. Generally oversees the operation of the Defender Clinic.
      2. Assists the supervising attorney in developing the academic component of the course.
      3. Provides faculty assistance and guidance to the supervising attorney in the areas of educational techniques, student evaluations, fieldwork assignments, etc.
      4. Confers regularly with the supervising attorney to ensure that the goals and purposes of the course are being achieved.
      5. Conducts site visits to the fieldwork site.
      6. Maintains the official law school records on the operation of the Defender Clinic.
  4. Field Work Component -- Description of Student Practice in the Defender Clinic
    1. Students engage in those activities authorized under Wisconsin Supreme Court Rule SCR 50.06 of the Rules for the Practical Training of Law Students. The terms andconditions of those rules govern student practice in the Defender Clinic.
    2. Students assist the cooperating attorneys in providing the full range of defense services, including the following:
      1. Case investigation
      2. Indigency determinations and initial appearances
      3. Preliminary hearings (when assigned to felony division)
      4. Arraignments
      5. Evidentiary and non-evidentiary motions
      6. Pre-trial conferences
      7. Trials
      8. Sentencing proceedings
  5. Academic Component
    1. The academic component is taught in a classroom setting at the Law School and is designed to broaden the students' understanding of substantive law and procedure, to integrate this knowledge with its application in the field, and to develop the specific lawyering skills identified in the statement of course purpose. (See sec. II above).
    2. Course content of the academic component includes a study of the law, the ethics and strategies involved in the following defense functions:
      1. Case investigation
      2. Defense at the initial appearance and preliminary hearing
      3. Discovery
      4. Plea negotiating
      5. Criminal motion practice
      6. Criminal trial procedure
  6. Evaluation of Student Performance
    1. Evaluation and grade assignments are the responsibility of the supervising attorney.
    2. A letter grade (A, AB, B, BC, C, D or F) is used to evaluate student performance.
    3. The course grade is based upon an evaluation of the totality of student performance in both components of the Defender Clinic. This includes an assessment of each student's substantive knowledge, practice skills, written work product, and personal effort and initiative.
  7. Hours, Credits and Prerequisites
    1. The Defender Clinic is offered once annually. It is two semesters in duration, commencing in August and concluding in May. No credit is earned unless the student completes both semesters of the program.
    2. Credit Hours: 6 (3 for the fall semester and 3 for the spring semester).
    3. Time Commitment: 360 hours (including time in class) evenly distributed over the course of two semesters.
    4. Classroom Hours: The Defender Clinic class meets weekly for a minimum of two hours.
    5. Prerequisites
      1. Only those students who qualify for student practice under the Rules for the Practical Training of Law Students (SCR 50.03) may enroll in the Defender Clinic.
      2. Each student must have completed the following courses in order to enroll in the Defender Clinic: Criminal Law, Evidence, Criminal Process, and Law and Ethics of Lawyering.
  8. Selection of Students and Course Enrollment
    1. Students are selected for participation in the Defender Clinic by the supervising attorney and the director of clinical education.
    2. Enrollment is limited to 12 students.

UNEMPLOYMENT COMPENSATION ADVOCACY CLINIC

The Unemployment Compensation Clinic, which was offered for the first time in the 2001-2002 academic year, is conducted in cooperation with Legal Action of Wisconsin, a nonprofit organization that represents the poor in civil matters. The clinic provides training for students in the law of unemployment compensation and provides them with an opportunity to participate in the representation of unemployment compensation claimants.

Students receive classroom training for one hour per week and additional instruction outside of the classroom. Students observe and critique at least three unemployment insurance hearings and represent claimants in at least two hearings. Under the supervision of an attorney, they engage in client interviews, case development, witness preparation, and representation at the administrative hearings.

Faculty Supervisors: Adjunct Assistant Professor Jeffrey Myer

Director of Clinical Education

Prerequisite: Limited to students who have completed 27 credits.

Graded: Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory.

Credits: 2

Note: Involvement in this clinic may be continued in a subsequent semester for one credit with the permission of the instructor and the Director of Clinical Education.


JUDICIAL INTERNSHIP PROGRAMS

JUDICIAL INTERNSHIP PROGRAM APPELLATE COURTS

The Judicial Internship Program: Appellate Courts affords students an opportunity to clerk at the chambers of an appellate judge or justice. Internships are available with all seven justices of the Wisconsin Supreme Court, with judges of the Wisconsin Court of Appeals - District I (with chambers in Milwaukee), and with judges of the Wisconsin Court of Appeals - District II (with chambers in nearby Waukesha, Wisconsin). Placements are also available at the Milwaukee chambers of the Honorable John L. Coffey and the Honorable Diane S. Sykes of the United States Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit. The Director of Clinical Education supervises this program, coordinates placements, and teaches weekly classes for the interns.

PROGRAM SUMMARY

The Judicial Internship - Appellate Courts is a one-semester program available to 2L and 3L students. It is offered each semester. Placements are available with the United States Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit (Milwaukee Chambers of Judge John L. Coffey and Judge Diane S. Sykes), with all seven justices of the Wisconsin Supreme Court, and with the judges of District I (Milwaukee) and District II (Waukesha) of the Wisconsin Court of Appeals.

Credits: 2 (except 3 credits are awarded for the Seventh Circuit internship at Judge Coffey's Chambers) Duration of Internship: One Semester
Time Commitment: 120 Hours (including time spent in the classroom component) (except 180 hours are required for the Seventh Circuit internship at Judge Coffey's Chambers)
Grade: Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory
Faculty Supervisor: Director of Clinical Education

Wisconsin Supreme Court. This internship is principally a legal analysis and legal writing experience in which students work primarily on bench memos for upcoming oral arguments. Assignments are coordinated and critiqued by the assigned justice's law clerk, though participating justices often meet with the students individually to discuss their work product prior to oral arguments in the cases the students have worked on. Most students also avail themselves of the opportunity to observe those oral arguments. In some chambers students also participate in the preparation of opinions or parts of opinions.

Wisconsin Court of Appeals. This internship is principally a legal analysis and writing experience. Students work on draft opinions under the supervision of the judges and their law clerks. Other research assignments may be given as well. Placements are available with District I and District II of the court. Because so much of this internship involves working on court opinions, most of the intern's work is done at the court's chambers.

Hon. John L. Coffey, United States Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit. Senior U. S. Circuit Judge (and former Wisconsin Supreme Court Justice) John L. Coffey maintains his chambers in the U. S. Courthouse at 517 E. Wisconsin Avenue in Milwaukee. Generally, interns write bench memos for the judge in preparation for oral arguments. This internship is principally a legal analysis and legal writing experience. All work is required to be performed in chambers under the supervision of the judge and his law clerks.

Hon. Diane S. Sykes, United States Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit. U.S. Circuit Judge (and former Wisconsin Supreme Court Justice) Diane S. Sykes maintains her chambers in the U.S. Courthouse at 517 East Wisconsin Avenue in Milwaukee. Generally, interns prepare bench memoranda which the judge uses to prepare for oral arguments and they perform such other research assignments and technical work on opinions as may be requested of them. This internship is principally a legal analysis and legal writing experience.

JUDICIAL INTERNSHIP PROGRAM TRIAL COURTS

The Judicial Internship Program: Trial Courts affords students an opportunity to clerk for a trial court judge. Internships are available with judges of the Circuit Court of Milwaukee County (and occasionally with judges in other counties) in the civil, family, felony, misdemeanor and juvenile divisions. Student preferences for placement in a particular division are accommodated. Internships are also available with United States District Judges Rudolph T. Randa, Lynn Adelman and William Griesbach, with the United States Magistrate Judges for the Eastern District of Wisconsin, and with the United States Bankruptcy Court. The Director of Clinical Education supervises this program, coordinates placements, and teaches a series of classes for judicial interns.

PROGRAM SUMMARY

In the Judicial Internship: Trial Courts program, students intern with either a Milwaukee County Circuit Court judge, a United States District Judge, a United States Magistrate Judge, or a United States Bankruptcy Judge.

Credits: 2
Duration of Internship: One Semester
Time Commitment: 120 Hours (including time spent in the classroom component)
Grade: Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory
Faculty Supervisor: Director of Clinical Education

Wisconsin Circuit Courts: Wisconsin Circuit Courts: Placements in state courts are ordinarily with judges of the Milwaukee County Circuit Court. With the exception of Children's Court judges whose courts and chambers are located in Wauwatosa, all of the state court judges are located within two blocks of the law school. Internship placements in the state circuit court may be available in the following specialized divisions of the circuit court: Civil, Felony, Misdemeanor, Children's, and Family.

These internships are not principally legal analysis and legal writing experiences, but rather are opportunities to observe lawyer and judicial behavior in trial courtrooms and chambers. Typically there is an opportunity to discuss the observations with the presiding judge. Some research and writing may be involved, depending upon the judge and the division in which the student works. In the Circuit Court program placements in the various divisions of the court are made according to preferences expressed by students at the time of application for admission to the program.

On occasion a circuit court judicial internship with a judge who presides in a county other than Milwaukee County is authorized if requested by the student, agreed to by the judge, and authorized by the Director of Clinical Education.

U.S. District Court and U.S. Magistrate Judge's Court. Internships in the federal district court and in the federal magistrate judges' courts may involve either civil or criminal matters. With the exception of U.S. District Judge William C. Griesbach who sits in Green Bay, the participating judges have chambers located in the Federal Courthouse at 517 East Wisconsin Avenue in Milwaukee.

Internships with the federal district courts are principally research and writing experiences. Students work on opinions and orders and they perform such other research as may requested by the judge and the judge's clerks. They also observe proceedings in the courtroom when the judge is on the bench and proceedings in chambers when invited to do so. This internship is an excellent introduction to the workings of the federal district courts.

Placements are also available with all three United States Magistrate Judges who sit in the Eastern District of Wisconsin. In the federal system magistrate judges hear civil cases with the consent of the parties, conduct preliminary proceedings in criminal cases (initial appearances, bail hearings, pretrial motion hearings, etc.), handle certain administrative agency appeals, and provide such other assistance to the district judges as authorized by law. Interns typically work with both the judge and the judge's law clerk(s). The work includes both legal analysis and writing assignments and courtroom/chambers observations.

U.S. Bankruptcy Court. In this program students serve as interns with a United States Bankruptcy Judge presiding in the Eastern District of Wisconsin. They attend courtroom hearings, chambers proceedings, and Sec. 341 hearings before the U.S. Trustee. There is typically an opportunity to discuss the cases with the judge. Some research and writing assignments may also be given.

SUPERVISED FIELDWORK PROGRAMS

AIDS RESOURCE CENTER

AGENCY: AIDS RESOURCE CENTER OF WISCONSIN LEGAL SERVICES

LOCATION: 820 North Plankinton Avenue
P. O. Box 510498
Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53203-0092
(414) 225-1578

AGENCY LAWYER SUPERVISING STUDENTS: Director of Legal Services Amelia Bizzaro
Tele: (414) 225-1532
amelia.bizzaro@arcw.org

FACULTY SUPERVISOR: Director of Clinical Education

DESCRIPTION OF PROGRAM: Students assist staff lawyers in a variety of legal matters, including advance directives, discrimination in employment, housing and public accommodations, social security disability, insurance, guardianships, evictions and bankruptcies. Activities include interviewing clients, conducting legal research, drafting documents, assisting attorneys at hearings, etc.

DURATION OF PROGRAM: One semester

FREQUENCY OF PROGRAM: Offered each semester (summer placements available)

CREDIT HOURS: 2 credit hours

TIME COMMITMENT: 120 hours evenly distributed throughout the semester. The agency offers some late afternoon/early evening hours for students.

PLACEMENTS AVAILABLE: 3 per semester (plus two per summer)

PREREQUISITES FOR ADMISSION: Civil Procedure
Limited to students who have completed 27 credits.

SYSTEM OF GRADING: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory. A satisfactory grade is earned by completing all projects in a satisfactory manner, by fulfilling time requirements, and by meeting such other standards as established by the faculty supervisor.

RESPONSIBILITY FOR SITE VISITATION: Director of Clinical Education


CATHOLIC CHARITIES IMMIGRATION ASSISTANCE PROJECT

AGENCY: Catholic Charities of the Archdiocese of Milwaukee, Inc.

LOCATION: 2057 South 14th Street
Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53204
Telephone: (414) 643-8570 Ext. 14 (Immigration Project Office)

AGENCY LAWYER(S) SUPERVISING STUDENTS: Barbara Graham

FACULTY SUPERVISOR: Professor Edward Fallone

DESCRIPTION OF PROGRAM: In this program students assist in the provision of legal representation to non-citizens of low income seeking immigration benefits. They interview clients, assist in the preparation of relevant documents, research legal issues pertinent to immigration law, and perform such other case-related tasks as may be necessary.

DURATION OF PROGRAM: One semester

FREQUENCY OF PROGRAM: Offered each semester (summer placements available)

CREDIT HOURS: 2 credit hours

TIME COMMITMENT: 120 hours evenly distributed throughout the semester

PREREQUISITE OR CO-REQUISITE FOR ADMISSION: Immigration Law
Limited to students who have completed 27 credits.

SYSTEM OF GRADING: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory. A satisfactory grade is earned by completing all projects in a satisfactory manner, by fulfilling time requirements, and by meeting such other standards as established by the faculty supervisor.

RESPONSIBILITY FOR SITE VISITATION: Director of Clinical Education


CENTRO LEGAL
www.centrolegalwisconsin.org

AGENCY: CENTRO LEGAL POR DERECHOS HUMANOS

LOCATION: 1711 South 11th Streetc Milwaukee WI 53204 (414) 384-7900 FAX (414) 384-6222

AGENCY LAWYER(S) SUPERVISING STUDENTS: Christopher Ford
Erin Karshen
Jason Mishelow

FACULTY SUPERVISOR: Professor Edward Fallone

DESCRIPTION OF PROGRAM: Centro Legal is a nonprofit organization located on the south side of Milwaukee that provides free and low-cost legal services to low-income residents. Students normally work on matters in a number of practice areas, including family law, criminal (and some civil) defense, and immigration law. Students certified under the Wisconsin Student Practice Rule may engage in practice activities permitted by that rule.

DURATION OF PROGRAM: One semester

FREQUENCY OF PROGRAM: Offered each semester

CREDIT HOURS: 2 credit hours

NUMBER OF PLACEMENTS: One or two students per semester

TIME COMMITMENT: 120 hours evenly distributed throughout the semester

PREREQUISITES FOR ADMISSION: Civil Procedure. Limited to students who have completed 27 credits.

SYSTEM OF GRADING: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory. A satisfactory grade is earned by completing all projects in a satisfactory manner, by fulfilling time requirements, and by meeting such other standards as established by the faculty supervisor.

OTHER INFORMATION: The great majority of clients are English speaking; thus knowledge of Spanish is not required.

RESPONSIBILITY FOR SITE VISITATION: Director of Clinical Education


DISTRICT ATTORNEY OFFICES

AGENCIES: DISTRICT ATTORNEY OFFICES IN COUNTIES OTHER THAN MILWAUKEE COUNTY

AGENCY LAWYER SUPERVISING STUDENTS: District Attorney of the County of Placement

FACULTY SUPERVISOR: Director of Clinical Education

DESCRIPTION OF PROGRAM: This program is similar to the Prosecutor Clinic conducted at the Milwaukee County District Attorney's Office except that placements are with various district attorney offices in other counties. District attorneys who have participated in this program include those in Racine County, Waukesha County, and Walworth County.

DURATION OF PROGRAM: One semester

FREQUENCY OF PROGRAM: Offered each semester

CREDIT HOURS: 3 credit hours

TIME COMMITMENT: 180 hours evenly distributed throughout the semester

PREREQUISITES FOR ADMISSION: Criminal Law, Evidence, Criminal Process, and Law and Ethics of Lawyering. Further, students must have completed 45 credits prior to enrollment (a Student Practice Rule requirement).

SYSTEM OF GRADING: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory. A satisfactory grade is earned by completing all projects in a satisfactory manner, by fulfilling time requirements, and by meeting such other standards as established by the faculty supervisor.

OTHER INFORMATION: Students participating in the District Attorney Supervised Fieldwork Program must also attend the weekly classroom component of the Prosecutor Clinic.

RESPONSIBILITY FOR SITE VISITATION: Director of Clinical Education


FEDERAL DEFENDER

AGENCY: Federal Defender Services of Eastern Wisconsin, Inc.

LOCATION: Federal Building
517 East Wisconsin Avenue
Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53202
(414) 221-9900

AGENCY LAWYERS SUPERVISING STUDENTS: Dean Strang, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Law
Nancy Joseph

FACULTY SUPERVISOR: Professor Gregory O'Meara, S.J.

DESCRIPTION OF PROGRAM: Students assist Federal Defenders in the representation of indigents in federal criminal prosecutions. Activities include interviewing clients, performing legal research and writing, assisting in case preparation, accompanying supervising lawyers to federal court, etc.

DURATION OF PROGRAM: One semester

FREQUENCY OF PROGRAM: Offered each semester

CREDIT HOURS: 2 credit hours

TIME COMMITMENT: 120 hours evenly distributed throughout the semester

PLACEMENTS AVAILABLE: 2 per semester (plus one per summer)

PREREQUISITES FOR ADMISSION: Criminal Law, Evidence and Criminal Process

SYSTEM OF GRADING: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory. A satisfactory grade is earned by completing all projects in a satisfactory manner, by fulfilling time requirements, and by meeting such other standards as established by the faculty supervisor.

STUDENT PRACTICE RULE CERTIFICATION: NO

RESPONSIBILITY FOR SITE VISITATION: Director of Clinical Education

OTHER: Personal interview with agency staff required before placement is made.
No FBI background investigation is necessary.


INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE

AGENCY: INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE DISTRICT COUNSEL
(Midwest Region)

LOCATION: 310 West Wisconsin Avenue Suite 760
Milwaukee WI 53203-2221

AGENCY LAWYER(S) SUPERVISING STUDENTS: Frederic J. Fernandez
Telephone: (414) 297-1106

FACULTY SUPERVISORS: Professors Patricia Bradford and Vada Lindsey

DESCRIPTION OF PROGRAM: The student interns assist attorneys in preparing cases for trial before the United States Tax Court, reviewing the merits of refund litigation, furnishing legal advice necessary to protect and collect tax claims of the United States (which may involve matters pertaining to bankruptcy, administrative summonses, liens, levies, decedents' estates, etc.), and perhaps evaluating potential criminal tax prosecutions.

DURATION OF PROGRAM: One semester

FREQUENCY OF PROGRAM: Offered each semester (not available in summer)

CREDIT HOURS: 2 credit hours

TIME COMMITMENT: 120 hours evenly distributed throughout the semester

MAXIMUM NUMBER OF POSITIONS: 1

PREREQUISITES FOR ADMISSION: Federal Income Taxation
Limited to students who have completed 27 credits.

SYSTEM OF GRADING: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory. A satisfactory grade is earned by completing all projects in a satisfactory manner, by fulfilling time requirements, and by meeting such other standards as established by the faculty supervisor.

RESPONSIBILITY FOR SITE VISITATION: Director of Clinical Education


LEGAL ACTION OF WISCONSIN, INC.

AGENCY: Legal Action of Wisconsin, Inc.

LOCATION: 230 West Wells Street Room 800
Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53203
(414) 278-7722

AGENCY LAWYER(S) SUPERVISING STUDENTS: Managing Attorney Patricia Risser
Telephone: (414) 278-7722 Ext 3063
e-mail: pzr@legalaction.org
Fax: (414) 278-7126

FACULTY SUPERVISOR: Director of Clinical Education

DESCRIPTION OF PROGRAM: Legal Action of Wisconsin exists to provide creative and effective legal representation to low income people and others to whom access to the justice system might otherwise be denied. In this program students work with agency lawyers in representing clients with the following types of legal problems: Housing (including eviction defense, abusive landlord practices, housing conditions and habitability, and access to affordable housing), Family Law (including divorce, child support and maintenance, custody/visitation, restraining orders/injunctions, and paternity cases); and Public Benefits/Health Law (including food stamps, disability benefits and Supplemental Security Income (SSI), General Assistance, energy assistance, Medicaid, BadgerCare, and Wisconsin Works (W-2) matters). The Managing Attorney attempts to assign students within these areas of law practice according to their interests.

Students assist agency lawyers in the full range of legal services provided to clients. Typical student activities include screening new cases, performing follow-up on accepted cases, providing such other legal assistance on cases as may be necessary, and attending court and agency hearings with their supervising attorneys. Those licensed under the Student Practice Rule may also make court/hearing appearances on behalf of clients as permitted by the Rule.

DURATION OF PROGRAM: One semester

FREQUENCY OF PROGRAM: Offered each semester (including summers)

CREDIT HOURS: 2 credit hours

TIME COMMITMENT: 120 hours evenly distributed throughout the semester

MAXIMUM NUMBER OF POSITIONS: 2-3 per semester

PREREQUISITES FOR ADMISSION: Limited to students who have completed 27 credits.

Students who have completed 45 credits and the Law and Ethics of Lawyering course qualify for student practice under the Wisconsin Student Practice Rule and may have the opportunity to appear in court on behalf of Legal Action clients (subject to the provisions of the Rule).

SYSTEM OF GRADING: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory. A satisfactory grade is earned by completing all projects in a satisfactory manner, by fulfilling time requirements, and by meeting such other standards as established by the faculty supervisor.

RESPONSIBILITY FOR SITE VISITATION: Director of Clinical Education

LINK TO THE LAW SCHOOL CURRICULUM: Family Law Course Stream
Health Law Course Stream
Elder Law
Civil Legal Services to the Poor


LEGAL AID SOCIETY OF MILWAUKEE

AGENCY: Legal Aid Society of Milwaukee

LOCATION: 229 East Wisconsin Avenue Suite 200
Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53202-4204
Telephone: (414) 727-5300

AGENCY LAWYER(S) SUPERVISING STUDENTS: James Walrath, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Law
Peter Koneazny
(414) 727-5333
pkoneazny@lasmilwaukee.com

FACULTY SUPERVISOR: Director of Clinical Education

DESCRIPTION OF PROGRAM: The Legal Aid Society of Milwaukee, furnishes a wide variety of civil legal services to low income clients in the Milwaukee area. In addition to the broad general civil representation (e.g., family law, landlord tenant matters, consumer fraud) that is provided, a number of Society lawyers offer services in Children's Court in the Guardian ad Litem Project. Others represent clients in involuntary civil commitment proceedings, while yet others work with homeless clients. The nature of the work that a student intern engages in depends on the program (e.g., GAL, elderly, general civil) the student works with. Depending on agency requirements and intern interests, students may serve in a number of different service areas within LAS or concentrate in one area.

DURATION OF PROGRAM: One semester

FREQUENCY OF PROGRAM: Offered each semester (summer placements available)

CREDIT HOURS: 2 credit hours

TIME COMMITMENT: 120 hours evenly distributed throughout the semester

MAXIMUM NUMBER OF POSITIONS: 6

PREREQUISITES FOR ADMISSION: Civil Procedure
Limited to students who have completed 27 credits.

SYSTEM OF GRADING: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory. A satisfactory grade is earned by completing all projects in a satisfactory manner, by fulfilling time requirements, and by meeting such other standards as established by the faculty supervisor.

RESPONSIBILITY FOR SITE VISITATION: Director of Clinical Education


MARQUETTE UNIVERSITY LAW SCHOOL RESTORATIVE JUSTICE INITIATIVE

AGENCY: Marquette University Law School Restorative Justice Initiative in collaboration with the Milwaukee County FOCUS Program, the Milwaukee Secure Detention Facility, and the Benedict Center's Southside Community Justice Center.

LOCATION: The program is headquartered at the Law School in the Office of the Marquette University Law School Restorative Justice Initiative.

AGENCY LAWYER(S) SUPERVISING PROGRAM: Professor Janine P. Geske

FACULTY SUPERVISOR: Professor Janine P. Geske

DESCRIPTION OF PROGRAM: Eight law students will do clinical work with FOCUS (a prison alternative program at St. Charles House for juvenile offenders), the Milwaukee Secure Detention Facility (a prison operated by the Wisconsin Department of Corrections in downtown Milwaukee), and the Southside Community Justice Center organized by the Benedict Center. The Southside Community Justice Center houses a community prosecutor, a community public defender, community police, and probation and parole agents; students will work with those entities and the neighborhoods in the development of restorative justice processes. Additionally the students will be working with other community, educational and restorative justice programs around the state that request assistance in restorative justice process development.

DURATION OF PROGRAM: One Semester

FREQUENCY OF PROGRAM: Offered each fall and spring semester

CREDIT HOURS: 2 credit hours

CLASSROOM COMPONENT: 2-hour meeting once per week

TIME COMMITMENT: 120 hours evenly distributed throughout the semester

MAXIMUM NUMBER OF POSITIONS: Fall : 8
Spring: 8

PREREQUISITES FOR ADMISSION: Restorative Justice (to be enforced beginning with the 2006 spring semester)

Limited to students who have completed 27 credits.

SYSTEM OF GRADING: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory. A satisfactory grade is earned by completing all projects in a satisfactory manner, by fulfilling time requirements, and by meeting such other standards as established by the faculty supervisor.

RESPONSIBILITY FOR SITE VISITATION: Director of Clinical Education

LINK TO CURRICULAR COURSE STREAMS: Alternative Dispute Resolution
Criminal Law


MIDWEST ENVIRONMENTAL ADVOCATES

ORGANIZATION: Midwest Environmental Advocates

LOCATION: HS Law Offices
5630 North Lake Drive
Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53217

LAWYER SUPERVISING STUDENTS: Jodi Habush Sinykin Of Counsel, Midwest Environmental Advocates
Telephone: (414) 961-8944
e-mail: hslaw@bizwi.rr.com

FACULTY SUPERVISORS: Professors Michael O'Hear & Jason Czarnezki

DESCRIPTION OF PROGRAM: Midwest Environmental Advocates is the first and only non-profit environmental law center in Wisconsin. MEA provides legal and technical support to grassroots groups that are working for environmental justice in the Western Great Lakes region. MEA lawyers represent clients in citizen suits brought against corporations and government agencies alleged to be in violation of environmental laws. MEA lawyers also represent clients in administrative proceedings before state and federal agencies.

Law students assist MEA attorneys in the full range of activities in which those lawyers engage including, but not limited to, researching environmental and administrative law, drafting pleadings and briefs, meeting with clients, reviewing public records, and drafting comments for administrative proceedings.

DURATION OF PROGRAM: One semester

FREQUENCY OF PROGRAM: Offered each semester (excluding summers)

CREDIT HOURS: 2 credit hours

TIME COMMITMENT: 120 hours evenly distributed throughout the semester

MAXIMUM NUMBER OF POSITIONS: 1 position each semester

PREREQUISITES FOR ADMISSION: Environmental Law (LAW 436)

Limited to students who have completed 27 credits.

SYSTEM OF GRADING: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory. A satisfactory grade is earned by completing all projects in a satisfactory manner, by fulfilling time requirements, and by meeting such other standards as established by the faculty supervisor.

RESPONSIBILITY FOR SITE VISITATION: Director of Clinical Education

LINK TO THE CURRICULAR COURSE STREAMS: Environmental Law


MILWAUKEE COUNTY DISTRICT ATTORNEY RESTORATIVE JUSTICE PROGRAM

AGENCY: Milwaukee County District Attorney's Office

LOCATION: Milwaukee County Safety Building
821 West State Street Room 405
Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53233

AGENCY LAWYER(S) SUPERVISING STUDENTS: Assistant District Attorney David Lerman (Restorative Justice Coordinator)
Telephone: (414) 278-4655
e-mail: lerman.david@mail.da.state.wi.us

FACULTY SUPERVISOR: Professor Andrea Schneider

DESCRIPTION OF PROGRAM: Students engage in the full gamut of restorative justice practices in the Milwaukee County District Attorney's Office. These include the Community Conferencing Program (a process in which the victim, the offender and community members come together to discuss the facts and impact of the harm and what can happen to repair this harm) and the Neighborhood Initiative (a program which focuses on the links between communities and the criminal justice system). Students will also be expected to engage in legal research in a variety of subject areas, for example, legislative proposals, reported restorative justice outcomes, and particular legal concepts.

DURATION OF PROGRAM: One semester

FREQUENCY OF PROGRAM: Offered each semester (including summers)

CREDIT HOURS: 2 credit hours

TIME COMMITMENT: 120 hours evenly distributed throughout the semester

MAXIMUM NUMBER OF POSITIONS: Two

PREREQUISITES FOR ADMISSION: Criminal Law, Criminal Process, and Alternative Dispute Resolution

Limited to students who have completed 27 credits.

SYSTEM OF GRADING: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory. A satisfactory grade is earned by completing all projects in a satisfactory manner, by fulfilling time requirements, and by meeting such other standards as established by the faculty supervisor.

RESPONSIBILITY FOR SITE VISITATION: Director of Clinical Education

LINK TO CURRICULAR COURSE STREAMS: Criminal Law
Alternative Dispute Resolution


NATIONAL LABOR RELATIONS BOARD

AGENCY: NATIONAL LABOR RELATIONS BOARD - REGION 30

LOCATION: 310 West Wisconsin Avenue #700
Milwaukee WI 53203-2200

AGENCY LAWYER(S) SUPERVISING STUDENTS: Benjamin Mandelman (Acting Regional Attorney)
Telephone: (414) 297-3881
Fax: 297-3880
benjamin.mandelman@nlrb.gov

FACULTY SUPERVISOR: Prof. Phoebe Williams

DESCRIPTION OF PROGRAM: Students intern at the regional office of the National Labor Relations Board in downtown Milwaukee. Their work involves some research for matters in litigation. The interns also participate in representation election proceedings, unfair labor practice investigations and hearings, and injunction proceedings.

DURATION OF PROGRAM: One semester

FREQUENCY OF PROGRAM: Offered each semester (not offered in summer)

CREDIT HOURS: 2 credit hours

TIME COMMITMENT: 120 hours evenly distributed throughout the semester

PREREQUISITES FOR ADMISSION: Labor Law
Limited to students who have completed 27 credits.

SYSTEM OF GRADING: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory. A satisfactory grade is earned by completing all projects in a satisfactory manner, by fulfilling time requirements, and by meeting such other standards as established by the faculty supervisor.

OTHER INFORMATION: Students cannot be working for law firms that represent unions or private sector employers.

RESPONSIBILITY FOR SITE VISITATION: Director of Clinical Education


UNITED STATES ATTORNEY'S OFFICE

AGENCY: OFFICE OF THE UNITED STATES ATTORNEY FOR THE EASTERN DISTRICT OF WISCONSIN

LOCATION: Federal Building
517 East Wisconsin Avenue
Milwaukee WI 53202
(414) 297-1700

AGENCY LAWYER(S) SUPERVISING STUDENTS: Carol Kraft (Assistant United States Attorney)

FACULTY SUPERVISOR: Director of Clinical Education

DESCRIPTION OF PROGRAM: Students work with Assistant United States Attorneys in the civil and criminal divisions of the office in the representation of the United States as a party in a wide variety of matters.

DURATION OF PROGRAM: One semester

FREQUENCY OF PROGRAM: Offered each semester

CREDIT HOURS: 2 credit hours

TIME COMMITMENT: 120 hours evenly distributed throughout the semester

MAXIMUM NUMBER OF POSITIONS: 3-4

PREREQUISITES FOR ADMISSION: Criminal Law, Evidence and Criminal Process
Limited to students who have completed 27 credits.

SYSTEM OF GRADING: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory. A satisfactory grade is earned by completing all projects in a satisfactory manner, by fulfilling time requirements, and by meeting such other standards as established by the faculty supervisor.

RESPONSIBILITY FOR SITE VISITATION: Director of Clinical Education


UNITED STATES DEP'T OF AGRICULTURE OFFICE OF GENERAL COUNSEL

AGENCY: United States Department of Agriculture Office of General Counsel

LOCATION: 626 East Wisconsin Avenue Suite 601
Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53202

AGENCY LAWYER(S) SUPERVISING STUDENTS: Michael Danaher, Regional Attorney
Telephone: (414) 297-3774
e-mail: michael.danaher@usda.gov

FACULTY SUPERVISOR: Professor Michael O'Hear

DESCRIPTION OF PROGRAM: The Milwaukee, Wisconsin Branch Office provides legal services to the USDA Forest Service and Natural Resources Conservation Service [NRCS] in their administration of programs within the area serviced by the office. With respect to USDA Forest Service programs, this area encompasses 20 states and includes 43 % of the nation's population, 9 out of the top 20 U.S. metropolitan areas, and 90% of all Federal land in the Eastern United States. Legal services are provided to the NRCS in the states of Wisconsin, Michigan and Illinois.

The office is involved in all phases of the legal work provided to the 20-state Eastern Region of the USDA, Forest Service (R-9), including litigation [both civil and criminal]; land management planning and administration; issues related to the National Environmental Policy Act, National Forest Management Act, and other environmental statutes and regulations; contracts; real property and right-of-way acquisitions; trespass and title claims; tort claims; land exchanges; and minerals and special use permit matters. Law students assist agency lawyers assigned to the Milwaukee Office in the full range of activities in which those lawyers engage.

DURATION OF PROGRAM: One semester

FREQUENCY OF PROGRAM: Offered each semester (including summers)

CREDIT HOURS: 2 credit hours

TIME COMMITMENT: 120 hours evenly distributed throughout the semester

MAXIMUM NUMBER OF POSITIONS: One

PREREQUISITES FOR ADMISSION: Completion of Natural Resources course preferred.

Limited to students who have completed 27 credits.

SYSTEM OF GRADING: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory. A satisfactory grade is earned by completing all projects in a satisfactory manner, by fulfilling time requirements, and by meeting such other standards as established by the faculty supervisor.

RESPONSIBILITY FOR SITE VISITATION: Director of Clinical Education

LINK TO THE CURRICULAR COURSE STREAMS: Environmental Law


UNITED STATES EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY COMMISSION

AGENCY: UNITED STATES EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY COMMISSION - MILWAUKEE DISTRICT

LOCATION: 310 West Wisconsin Avenue Suite 800
Milwaukee WI 53203-2200

AGENCY LAWYER(S) SUPERVISING STUDENTS: Rosemary Fox
Telephone: (414) 297-4131

FACULTY SUPERVISOR: Prof. Phoebe Williams

DESCRIPTION OF PROGRAM: Students work in the Milwaukee office of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission assisting staff attorneys in the investigation of complaints and preparation of cases for trial and hearing. Skills development is primarily in the area of fact investigation and analysis as well as case preparation.

DURATION OF PROGRAM: One semester

FREQUENCY OF PROGRAM: Offered each semester (including summers)

CREDIT HOURS: 2 credit hours

TIME COMMITMENT: 120 hours evenly distributed throughout the semester

MAXIMUM NUMBER OF POSITIONS: 3 per semester

PRE-REQUISITE OR CO-REQUISITE FOR ADMISSION: Employment Discrimination
Limited to students who have completed 27 credits.

SYSTEM OF GRADING: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory. A satisfactory grade is earned by completing all projects in a satisfactory manner, by fulfilling time requirements, and by meeting such other standards as established by the faculty supervisor.

RESPONSIBILITY FOR SITE VISITATION: Director of Clinical Education


WISCONSIN DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE CRIMINAL APPEALS UNIT

AGENCY: Wisconsin Department of Justice Criminal Appeals Unit

LOCATION: Risser Justice Center
17 West Main Street
Madison WI 53707-7857

AGENCY LAWYER(S) SUPERVISING PROGRAM: Gregory M. Weber
Assistant Attorney General
P. O. Box 7857
Madison WI 53707-7857
(608) 266-3935
webergm@doj.state.wi.us

FACULTY SUPERVISOR: Director of Clinical Education

DESCRIPTION OF PROGRAM: In this placement students are assigned to the Criminal Appeals Unit of the Wisconsin Department of Justice. This unit represents the State of Wisconsin in felony (and some misdemeanor) appeals before the Wisconsin Supreme Court and the Wisconsin Court of Appeals. It also represents the state in certain collateral attacks on convictions that are litigated in the federal courts.

Students are assigned to Assistant Attorneys General in the Appeals Unit and assist in the full range of activities associated with the Unit's appellate practice. They perform research, assist in the preparation of appellate briefs, participate in moot courts conducted prior to oral arguments, and attend oral arguments before the state's appellate courts. The internship offers an intensive research and writing experience for participants as well as a comprehensive introduction to appellate law, procedure and practice.

DURATION OF PROGRAM: Two Semesters [Note: This is a two-semester course that begins in the fall semester and concludes at the end of the spring term. No credit is awarded unless both semesters are completed.]

FREQUENCY OF PROGRAM: This supervised field placement is offered once per year. It is two semesters in duration beginning in August and concluding the following May.

CREDIT HOURS: A total of four credits are awarded (two for the fall term and two for spring term) upon completion of both semesters.

TIME COMMITMENT: The total time commitment is 240 hours spread over the course of two semesters.

MAXIMUM NUMBER OF POSITIONS: 2-3

PREREQUISITES FOR ADMISSION: Criminal Law (LAW 403), Evidence (LAW 443), Criminal Process (LAW 433), and Constitution & Criminal Investigation (LAW 429).

Limited to students who have completed 27 credits.

SYSTEM OF GRADING: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory. A satisfactory grade is earned by completing all projects in a satisfactory manner, by fulfilling time requirements, and by meeting such other standards as established by the faculty supervisor.

RESPONSIBILITY FOR SITE VISITATION: Director of Clinical Education

LINK TO CURRICULAR COURSE STREAM: Criminal Law

OTHER INFORMATION:
1. Applicants must clear a background check by the Wisconsin Department of Justice.
2. A presence in Madison at the Office of the Attorney General at least once per week is expected.


WISCONSIN DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE LEGAL SERVICES DIVISION

AGENCY: Wisconsin Department of Justice

LOCATION: Risser Justice Center
17 West Main Street
Madison WI 53707-7857

AGENCY LAWYER(S) SUPERVISING PROGRAM: JoAnne F. Kloppenburg
Assistant Attorney General
P. O. Box 7857
Madison WI 53707-7857
(608) 266-9227
kloppenburgjf@doj.state.wi.us

Michael J. Losse
Assistant Attorney General
P. O. Box 7857
Madison WI 53707-7857
(608) 266-7063
lossemj@doj.state.wi.us

FACULTY SUPERVISOR: Director of Clinical Education

DESCRIPTION OF PROGRAM: In this placement students are assigned to one of the units of the Legal Services Division of the Wisconsin Department of Justice, including Civil Litigation (including civil rights, torts and eminent domain), Employment, Medicaid Fraud, Consumer Protection, Environmental Protection, State Programs & Administration (including core governmental issues, tax, contracts and bankruptcy), and the Division of Legal Services Administration. An attempt is made to match placements with each student's interests and qualifications.

Students work as partners with Assistant Attorneys General on their cases and related projects. Assignments include drafting complaints, answers, motions and responses to motions, drafting trial and appellate court briefs, preparing discovery requests and responses, preparing memoranda on case-related issues, analyzing legislative proposals, and attending negotiations, settlement meetings and court hearings.

DURATION OF PROGRAM: One Semester

FREQUENCY OF PROGRAM: This supervised field placement is offered three times per year: fall semester, spring semester, and summer semester.

CREDIT HOURS: 2-3 (as determined in each instance by the Department of Justice and the Director of Clinical Education)

TIME COMMITMENT: For two credits the total time commitment is 120 hours spread over the course of the semester. For three credits the total time commitment is 180 hours spread over the course of the semester.

MAXIMUM NUMBER OF POSITIONS: 4-5

PREREQUISITES FOR ADMISSION: Civil Procedure (LAW 400)
Legal Writing and Research 1 (LAW 407)
Legal Writing and Research 2 (LAW 405)
Limited to students who have completed 27 credits.

SYSTEM OF GRADING: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory. A satisfactory grade is earned by completing all projects in a satisfactory manner, by fulfilling time requirements, and by meeting such other standards as established by the faculty supervisor.

RESPONSIBILITY FOR SITE VISITATION: Director of Clinical Education

LINK TO CURRICULAR COURSE STREAM: Civil Litigation
Environmental Law

OTHER INFORMATION:
1. Applicants must clear a background check by the Wisconsin Department of Justice.
2. A presence in Madison at the Office of the Attorney General at least once per week is expected.


WISCONSIN DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES BUREAU OF LEGAL SERVICES

AGENCY: Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources Bureau of Legal Services

LOCATION: 101 South Webster Street (GEF 2, 5th Floor)
P.O. Box 7921
Madison, Wisconsin 53707-7921

AGENCY LAWYER SUPERVISING STUDENTS:
Michael Lutz
Section Chief for the General Counsel Section
Telephone: (608) 267-7456
e-mail: michael.lutz@dnr.state.wi.us

FACULTY SUPERVISOR: Professor Jason J. Czarnezki

DESCRIPTION OF PROGRAM: The Bureau of Legal Services provides legal support for the entire Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources ("WDNR"). WDNR is dedicated to the preservation, protection, effective management, and maintenance of Wisconsin's natural resources. It is responsible for implementing the laws of the state and, where applicable, the laws of the federal government that protect and enhance the natural resources of our state. It is the one agency charged with full responsibility for coordinating the many disciplines and programs necessary to provide a clean environment and a full range of outdoor recreational opportunities for Wisconsin citizens and visitors.

The WDNR's Bureau of Legal Services is involved in many phases of environmental law including: wetlands protection, water resource management, dam safety, regulation of toxic substances, air pollution regulation, hunting and fishing regulation, recreational use issues, the public trust doctrine, and forestry management. Law students will assist WNDR attorneys in the full range of activities in which those lawyers engage including, but not limited to, performing legal research on environmental law in Wisconsin, preparing for and attending contested case hearings, drafting administrative regulations, and coordinating with other state and federal agencies.

Students participating in this program will likely do their primary work in one of three areas: (1) water law, water resource management, and zoning; (2) air and water pollution, and solid and hazardous waste program; and (3) law enforcement and wildlife. An attempt will be made to assign students within these areas according to their individual interests. During the course of the semester participants should expect to travel to the Bureau's office in Madison once per week.

DURATION OF PROGRAM: One semester

FREQUENCY OF PROGRAM: Offered each semester (including summers)

CREDIT HOURS: 2 credit hours

TIME COMMITMENT: 120 hours evenly distributed throughout the semester

MAXIMUM NUMBER OF POSITIONS: 2 positions each semester (including summers)

PREREQUISITES FOR ADMISSION: Completion of Environmental Law course required.

Limited to students who have completed 27 credits.

SYSTEM OF GRADING: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory. A satisfactory grade is earned by completing all projects in a satisfactory manner, by fulfilling time requirements, and by meeting such other standards as established by the faculty supervisor.

RESPONSIBILITY FOR SITE VISITATION: Director of Clinical Education

LINK TO THE CURRICULAR COURSE STREAMS: Environmental Law


WISCONSIN DEP'T OF WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT EQUAL RIGHTS DIVISION

AGENCY: Wisconsin Department of Workforce Development Equal Rights Division Civil Rights Bureau

LOCATION: 819 North 6th Street Room 255
Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53203

AGENCY LAWYER(S) SUPERVISING PROGRAM: Pamela Rasche
Hearing Section Chief
Telephone: (414) 227-4376
Fax: (414) 227-4084

FACULTY SUPERVISOR: Prof. Phoebe Williams

DESCRIPTION OF PROGRAM: Students intern in the Civil Rights Bureau of the Equal Rights Division of the Wisconsin Department of Workforce Development. The legal work of this bureau involves the enforcement of the Wisconsin Fair Employment Act, which prohibits discrimination in the employment setting.

The students are involved to the full range of activities of this agency. They spend time in the Investigative Section assisting in the intake of new complaints, the investigation of cases, and the preparation of initial probable cause determinations. They also work in the Hearing Section where they observe settlement conferences and contested administrative hearings, research legal issues, and assist in the preparation of written decisions and orders.

DURATION OF PROGRAM: One semester

FREQUENCY OF PROGRAM: Offered each semester (including summer)

CREDIT HOURS: 2 credit hours

TIME COMMITMENT: 120 hours evenly distributed throughout the semester

MAXIMUM NUMBER OF POSITIONS: 1-2 per semester

PREREQUISITES FOR ADMISSION: Employment Discrimination

Limited to students who have completed 27 credits.

SYSTEM OF GRADING: Satisfactory/unsatisfactory. A satisfactory grade is earned by completing all projects in a satisfactory manner, by fulfilling time requirements, and by meeting such other standards as established by the faculty supervisor.

RESPONSIBILITY FOR SITE VISITATION: Director of Clinical Education

LINK TO CURRICULAR COURSE STREAM: Labor and Employment Law


SELECTED TOPICS

DESCRIPTION OF PROGRAM: A supervised field placement approved by the Director of Clinical Education with a governmental, charitable or public interest law agency.

CREDIT HOURS: 2-3 as determined by the Director of Clinical Education.

TIME COMMITMENT: 60 hours per credit

PREREQUISITES/CO-REQUISITES: Students must have completed 27 credits and satisfy such other prerequisites or co-requisites as determined by the Director of Clinical Education.

FACULTY SUPERVISOR: Director of Clinical Education or his/her designate.

SYSTEM OF GRADING: Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory. Satisfactory/unsatisfactory. A satisfactory grade is earned by completing all projects in a satisfactory manner, by fulfilling time requirements, and by meeting such other standards as established by the faculty supervisor.

RESPONSIBILITY FOR SITE VISITATION: Director of Clinical Education


PREREQUISITES AND CO-REQUISITES FOR ENROLLMENT IN CLINICS, JUDICIAL INTERNSHIPS AND SUPERVISED FIELDWORK PROGRAMS

DEFINITIONS

1. A "prerequisite" is a course that must be completed before a student commences participation in a clinic, judicial internship or supervised fieldwork program.

2. A "co-requisite" is a course that may be completed while a student participates in a clinic, judicial internship or supervised fieldwork program.

LIST OF PREREQUISITES AND CO-REQUISITES

CLINICS

PROSECUTOR CLINIC 1 & 2 (LAW 592 & 593)

Prerequisites: Criminal Law, Criminal Process, Evidence, and Law & Ethics of Lawyering must be completed before commencing Prosecutor Clinic 1.
Co-requisites: None
Other: Student must have completed 45 credits prior to enrollment (a Student Practice Rule requirement).

DEFENDER CLINIC 1 & 2 (LAW 585 & 586)

Prerequisites: Criminal Law, Criminal Process, Evidence, and Law & Ethics of Lawyering must be completed before commencing Defender Clinic 1.
Co-requisites: None
Other: Student must have completed 45 credits prior to enrollment (a Student Practice Rule requirement).

MEDIATION CLINIC (LAW 589)

Prerequisites: None
Co-requisites: None
Other: Student must participate in a weekend of mediation training at the beginning of the semester unless he/she has previously participated in the Mediation Clinic.

Limited to students who have completed 27 credits.

UNEMPLOYMENT COMPENSATION CLINIC 1 & 2 (LAW 590 & 591)

Prerequisites: None Co-requisites: None
Other: Limited to students who have completed 27 credits.

JUDICIAL INTERNSHIPS

JUDICIAL INTERNSHIP: APPELLATE COURTS (LAW 587)

PLACEMENTS: WISCONSIN SUPREME COURT, WISCONSIN COURT OF APPEALS, AND SEVENTH CIRCUIT U.S. COURT OF APPEALS (JUDGE COFFEY AND JUDGE SYKES)
Prerequisites: Civil Procedure
Co-requisites: None
Other: Limited to students who have completed 27 credits.

JUDICIAL INTERNSHIP: TRIAL COURTS (LAW 588)

CIRCUIT COURT: CIVIL DIVISION
Prerequisites: Civil Procedure
Co-requisites: None
Other: Limited to students who have completed 27 credits.

CIRCUIT COURT: FELONY DIVISION
Prerequisites: Criminal Law and Criminal Process
Co-requisites: None
Other: Limited to students who have completed 27 credits.

CIRCUIT COURT: MISDEMEANOR DIVISION
Prerequisites: Criminal Law and Criminal Process
Co-requisites: None
Other: Limited to students who have completed 27 credits.

CIRCUIT COURT: CHILDREN'S DIVISION
Prerequisites: Civil Procedure and either Family Law or Juvenile Law
Co-requisites: None
Other: Limited to students who have completed 27 credits.

CIRCUIT COURT: FAMILY DIVISION
Prerequisites: Civil Procedure and Family Law
Co-requisites: None
Other: Limited to students who have completed 27 credits.

UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT FOR THE EASTERN DISTRICT OF WISCONSIN
Prerequisites: Civil Procedure
Co-requisites: None
Other: Limited to students who have completed 27 credits.

UNITED STATES MAGISTRATE JUDGES
Prerequisites: Civil Procedure
Co-requisites: None
Other: Limited to students who have completed 27 credits.

UNITED STATES BANKRUPTCY COURT
Prerequisites: Civil Procedure and Creditor-Debtor Law.
Co-requisites: None
Other: Limited to students who have completed 27 credits.

SUPERVISED FIELDWORK PROGRAMS (LAW 594)

AIDS RESOURCE CENTER OF WISCONSIN
Prerequisites: Civil Procedure
Co-requisites: None
Other: Limited to students who have completed 27 credits.

CATHOLIC CHARITIES IMMIGRATION ASSISTANCE PROJECT
Prerequisite or Co-requisite: Immigration Law
Other: Limited to students who have completed 27 credits.

CENTRO LEGAL POR DERECHOS HUMANOS
Prerequisites: Civil Procedure
Co-requisites: None
Other: Limited to students who have completed 27 credits.

DISTRICT ATTORNEY
Prerequisites: Criminal Law, Criminal Process, Evidence, and Law and Ethics of Lawyering

FEDERAL DEFENDER FOR THE EASTERN DISTRICT OF WISCONSIN
Prerequisites: Criminal Law, Evidence and Criminal Process
Co-requisites: None
Other: Limited to students who have completed 27 credits.

INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE
Prerequisites: Federal Income Taxation
Co-requisites: None
Other: Limited to students who have completed 27 credits.

LEGAL ACTION OF WISCONSIN, INC.
Prerequisites: None
Co-requisites: None
Other: Limited to students who have completed 27 credits. Further, those who have completed 45 credits (including Law and Ethics of Lawyering) may be certified for student practice in this program under the Wisconsin Student Practice Rule.

LEGAL AID SOCIETY OF MILWAUKEE
Prerequisites: Civil Procedure
Co-requisites: None
Other: Limited to students who have completed 27 credits.

MARQUETTE UNIVERSITY LAW SCHOOL RESTORATIVE JUSTICE INITIATIVE
Prerequisite: Restorative Justice (to be enforced for placements effective in Spring 2006)
Other: Limited to students who have completed 27 credits.

MIDWEST ENVIRONMENTAL ADVOCATES
Prerequisite: Environmental Law
Other: Limited to students who have completed 27 credits.

MILWAUKEE COUNTY DISTRICT ATTORNEY RESTORATIVE JUSTICE PROGRAM
Prerequisites: Criminal Law, Criminal Process and Alternative Dispute Resolution
Other: Limited to students who have completed 27 credits.

NATIONAL LABOR RELATIONS BOARD
Prerequisites: Labor Law Co-requisites: None Other: Limited to students who have completed 27 credits.

UNITED STATES ATTORNEY FOR THE EASTERN DISTRICT OF WISCONSIN
Prerequisites: Criminal Law, Evidence and Criminal Process
Co-requisites: None
Other: Limited to students who have completed 27 credits.

UNITED STATES EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY COMMISSION
Prerequisite or Co-requisite: Employment Discrimination
Other: Limited to students who have completed 27 credits.

UNITED STATES DEP'T OF AGRICULTURE OFFICE OF GENERAL COUNSEL
Prerequisite or Co-requisite: None, although completion of Natural Resources Courseis preferred.
Other: Limited to students who have completed 27 credits.

WISCONSIN DEP'T OF JUSTICE (OFFICE OF ATTORNEY GENERAL) CRIMINAL APPEALS UNIT
Prerequisites: Criminal Law, Criminal Process, Evidence, and Constitution and Criminal Investigation
Other: Limited to students who have completed 27 credits.

WISCONSIN DEP'T OF JUSTICE (OFFICE OF ATTORNEY GENERAL) LEGAL SERVICES DIVISION
Prerequisites: Civil Procedure, Legal Writing and Research 1, and Legal Writing and Research 2
Other: Limited to students who have completed 27 credits.

WISCONSIN DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES BUREAU OF LEGAL SERVICES
Prerequisite: Environmental Law
Other: Limited to students who have completed 27 credits.

WISCONSIN DEP'T OF WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT EQUAL RIGHTS DIVISION
Prerequisite: Employment Discrimination
Other: Limited to students who have completed 27 credits.

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