J. Gordon Hylton: In Memoriam 1952-2018

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Headshot of the late Professor Gordon Hylton.On May second, the Marquette community lost one of its most interesting, wonderfully eccentric, and beloved members, Professor Gordon Hylton, who died of complications from cancer.  Academics by and large are an enthusiastic group of people with extraordinary jobs that give them a privileged opportunity to study and share their passions with colleagues and students.  No one more thoroughly enjoyed and reveled in being part of that world than Gordon Hylton.  He was a devoted teacher, a relentless, careful, and thorough scholar, and a cherished colleague.

I personally found Gordon to be one of the most interesting people of my acquaintance largely because he had so many interests, found so many things fascinating, and, aided by a legendary memory, pursued them with passion and rigor and a remarkable urge to synthesize, to explain everything.  And he was generous. He enjoyed nothing so much as chatting with his students and his colleagues about baseball, country music, the odd personalities who sat on the Supreme Court, the reasonableness of property doctrines, the early history of Christianity, and always with great enthusiasm and courtesy, as if knowledge and insight were both important and the most fun.

Professor Hylton, was a native of Pearisburg, a small town (population, 2,699 in 2016) in Giles County in the SW corner of Virginia near the border with West Virginia.  He began his college and university career at Oberlin College in Ohio, where, he often explained, he enrolled because they let him play baseball.  In the course of his four years at Oberlin, the student radio station also let him host a country music program in the late night, early early morning hours.  Oberlin nurtured a pronounced competitive streak.  His roommates recall Gordon organizing them to enter a team in every intramural sport including inner tube water polo despite the fact that Gordon did not know how to swim, something his teammates discovered only well into the water polo season.

Continue reading “J. Gordon Hylton: In Memoriam 1952-2018”

The Significance of Others

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Black & white photo of Flatiron Building (NY) under constructionThe concept of bringing your significant other to law school with you almost every day probably sounds frustrating to some and fantastic to others. Due to my disability and the fact that she is my primary caregiver, my fiancée Caitlin attends school with me at least three days out of the week; I am sure you have seen us around. The truth of the matter is that it is both frustrating and great having Caitlin with me, oftentimes both at the same time.

Caitlin and I have been together since I was a senior in high school. She and I started living together when I started college and by my junior year she was attending the majority of my classes with me. Going into my 1L year the plan was for her to come to school with me three days of the week, with the other two days being covered by my other caregiver, Danny. Naively, I assumed that this plan would go just as smoothly for us as it had during the last two years of my undergraduate career. Having both attended Lakeland University, Caitlin and I shared a common group of friends there and she was already familiar with the campus and faculty. Even though the social sciences were not her area of study, she tended to follow along with some of my classes. We discovered quickly that law school is (at the risk of sounding incredibly cliché) a completely different animal.  Continue reading “The Significance of Others”

Finding My Confidence

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writing in Spanish
A quote the author looks at when she studies.

This semester in Professor Lisa Mazzie’s Advanced Legal Writing: Writing for Law Practice seminar, students are required to write one blog post on a law- or law school-related topic of their choice. Writing blog posts as a lawyer is a great way to practice writing skills, and to do so in a way that allows the writer a little more freedom to showcase his or her own voice, and—eventually for these students—a great way to maintain visibility as a legal professional. Here is one of those blog posts, this one written by 2L Mariana Concepcion.

Last summer after finishing my 1L year, I was at the beach. While I was enjoying the warm Texas sun, my brother asked me, “So, what’s your goal in law school?” Because it was a few days after taking my last final, I thought about answering “I don’t ever want to go back.” But I didn’t say that, I was just really tired.

I gave the question some thought as I looked out at the sea. What was my goal in law school? Why was I going back? So, I told my brother that my goal was to find my own voice so that I could use it to help those who don’t have a voice.

Find my own voice? I can talk, right? I may not be the loudest person on earth, but I have a voice. But finding my own voice wasn’t just about finding my speaking voice; it was more than that. I wanted to find my own voice because that would help me become more confident in myself, something I have struggled with for most of my life. If I could find that confidence in myself then I would be able to find my voice and use my voice to speak for those who don’t have a voice. Continue reading “Finding My Confidence”

9 Must-Have Products to Get You Through Finals

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This semester in Professor Lisa Mazzie’s Advanced Legal Writing: Writing for Law Practice seminar, students are required to write one blog post on a law- or law school-related topic of their choice. Writing blog posts as a lawyer is a great way to practice writing skills, and to do so in a way that allows the writer a little more freedom to showcase his or her own voice, and—eventually for these students—a great way to maintain visibility as a legal professional. Here is one of those blog posts, this one written by 2L Margaret Johnson.

It’s no secret that finals are just around the corner and that studying for finals in law school can be unpleasant at best and excruciatingly painful at worst. While I can’t guarantee any of these products will help you snag an honors grade, these are my favorite products for making the studying process more bearable – or at least more productive.

  1. Colored Pens and Highlighters

If you’re a pen-snob like me, nothing makes note-taking more enjoyable than a set of colorful pens to brighten up my outline and flashcards. If you’re looking for variety of fine-point gel pens that don’t smudge, look no further than KACO Retractable Gel Ink Pens. If you prefer pens that write more like a marker, check out the Huhuhero Fineliner Color Pen Set, which includes 10 colorful pens that write smoothly and clearly without smudging.

  1. Highlighters

Highlighters are great for color-coding different types of information in your outlines when studying for finals. Sharpie Clear View Highlighters offer vibrant colors and the clear tip allows you to neatly and evenly highlight across the page without smudging the page or getting ink on your hands.

  1. Notecards

Flashcards are great for rule-based classes like Civil Procedure or Evidence and for writing down case holdings and black-letter law. While writing out holdings and rules is time-consuming, I’ve found that doing so helps me remember the material that much better than just reading from my outline. Continue reading “9 Must-Have Products to Get You Through Finals”

Congratulations to the 2018 Jenkins Honors Moot Court Competition Finalists

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Congratulations to the winners of the 2018 Jenkins Honors Moot Court Competition, Olivia Garman and Sarita Olson. Congratulations also go to finalists Killian Commers and William Ruffing.  Killian Commers and William Ruffing additionally won the Franz C. Eschweiler Prize for Best Brief.  Olivia Garman won the Ramon A. Klitzke Prize for Best Oralist.

The competitors argued before a large audience in the Lubar Center. Presiding over the final round were Hon. Goodwin Liu, Hon. Stephen Murphy, and Hon. Lisa Neubauer.

Many thanks to the judges and competitors for their hard work, enthusiasm, and sportsmanship in all the rounds of competition, as well as to the moot court executive board and Law School administration and staff for their work in putting on the event. Special thanks to Dean Kearney for his support of the competition.  Thank you as well to the Moot Court Association for its work in putting this event together, and especially 3L executive board members Tsz King Tse, who organized the competition, and Chief Justice Nathan Oesch.

Students are selected to participate in the competition based on their success in the fall Appellate Writing and Advocacy class at the Law School.

Here is a link to the video of the final round.

2018 Jenkins Honors Moot Court Competitors Advance to Finals

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Congratulations to the 2018 Jenkins Honors Moot Court Competition finalists.  The teams advancing to the final rounds on April 19 are as follows:

Killian Commers and William Ruffing v. Olivia Garman and Sarita Olson

We appreciate the judging assistance in the semifinal round of the Hon. Michael Aprahamian, Hon. William Duffin, Hon. Beth Hanan, Hon. Michael Halfenger, Hon. Nancy Joseph, and Atty. Brent Nistler.

Congratulations to the 2018 Jenkins Honors Moot Court Competition Semifinalists

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Congratulations to the students in the 2018 Jenkins Honors Moot Court Competition who advanced from the quarterfinal round to the semifinal round.  These students will be competing at 1 p.m. today:

William Ruffing & Killian Commers v. Alexander Hensley & Claudia Ayala
Jehona Osmani & Emily Gaertner v. Sarita Olson & Olivia Garman

Congratulations to all the teams who competed in the quarterfinals.  We appreciated the judges coming out to hear the oralists.  Among the judges were a number of Jenkins and moot court alumni, including Natalie Schiferl, who came all the way from Minnesota to judge with her Jenkins partner, Mary Youssi.

Best of luck to the semifinalists!

Professor Atiba Ellis to Join Marquette Law in Fall 2018

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Prof Atiba Ellis Many in our community will recall Professor Atiba Ellis, who served as Boden Visiting Professor at the Law School during the fall 2017 semester.  He will return to the Law School for the fall 2018 semester—this time as professor of law and a member of the permanent faculty.  We are delighted that he will be joining us.

During his semester as the Boden visitor, Professor Ellis taught a course entitled Contemporary Issues in Civil Rights.  He also participated broadly and enthusiastically in the Law School community, including by delivering a faculty workshop, serving as a featured guest for one of Mike Gousha’s “On the Issues” sessions, and being consistently present in the common areas of Eckstein Hall for engagement with students and colleagues.

Professor Ellis joins Marquette Law School from the law school at West Virginia University, where he has been a member of the faculty since 2009.  In 2017, in addition to his semester at the Law School, he served as a Visiting Scholar at Duke University Law School.  Professor Ellis has taught courses in the areas of Election Law, Civil Rights Law, Race and the Law, Property, and Trusts and Estates.  His research and scholarship has focused on voting rights law and theory, critical legal theory, and legal history.  He is a well-established and highly regarded scholar whose work relates directly to matters of great present concern within Milwaukee and Wisconsin more generally.

Please join me in welcoming Professor Ellis (back) to Marquette University Law School.

Hindsight into My Legal Education: Respect the Past But Look Toward the Future

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Ben and son fishing
Ben and his son, fishing on Pewaukee Lake.

While looking back on how I came to law school and why I came to law school, I have come to believe that law school is both one of the best choices I have ever made and one of the worst.

This may seem like a statement that the law school will not want conveyed but it is true for me. While many if not most law students either dream about being lawyers or working in a career field that requires a law degree, I have never actively imagined myself to be a lawyer. Instead I view law school as a means to an end. Continue reading “Hindsight into My Legal Education: Respect the Past But Look Toward the Future”

Tuition Reduced for Summer Study Abroad in Germany

Posted on Categories International Law & Diplomacy, Legal Education, Marquette Law School, Public, UncategorizedLeave a comment» on Tuition Reduced for Summer Study Abroad in Germany
A group of over 30 law students stand together holding their certificates at the Closing Ceremony of the 2017 program in Giessen, Germany.
Summer Schools Justus-Liebig-Universität 2017 Closing Ceremony

Time is running out to apply for the 2018 Summer Session in International and Comparative Law to be held over 4 weeks in Giessen, Germany (July 14 – August 11, 2018).  The tuition for the program has been reduced in the amount of $750.  Accordingly, the total amount of academic and non-academic fees for 4 Law School credits, lodging and two field trips has been reduced to only $4,350 (airfare is still the responsibility of each student).  We are very pleased to be able to provide this reduction in the total cost of the program for all of our participants.

The deadline for applications for this summer’s program is March 23.  Applications will be accepted after the deadline if there is space available.  Applications can be downloaded on the following webpage:

https://law.marquette.edu/programs-degrees/international-comparative-law-germany

Additional details, including course and faculty information, can be viewed by navigating the links on the webpage.

This is a fantastic opportunity to live and learn with law students from all over the world and to take classes from an international faculty.  Don’t let this chance pass you by.

See Professor Fallone if you have any questions, or email him at edward.fallone@marquette.edu .

Congratulations to Marquette’s Evans Moot Court Competition Team

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This weekend 3ls Isabelle Faust and Jessica Lothman competed in the Evans Moot Court Competition at the University of Wisconsin Law School.  The team advanced to the quarterfinals (final eight), and they were seeded first in that round as well as in the final sixteen.  Isabelle was designated the third best oralist in the competition out of 52 individual competitors.  Isabelle and Jessica were coached by Attorneys Nick Chmurski, Erin Karshen, Matt Torbenson, Prashant Dayal, and Patrick Ruelle and faculty advisors Scott Idleman and Jacob Carpenter.  Their time and assistance is much appreciated.  Congratulations team!

NAAC Team Wins Fourth Best Brief at San Francisco Regional

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pic of Ashley Smith
Ashley Smith, 3L
pic of AJ Lawton
AJ Lawton, 3L
pic of Anjali Sharma
Anjali Sharma, 3L
pic of Adam Woodside
Adam Woodside, 3L

Thirty-two teams from across the country arrived in San Francisco at the United States District Court for the Northern District of California on March 1, all prepared to present oral arguments in the National Appellate Advocacy Competition regional. Two Marquette Law teams were among those.

Andrew (AJ) Lawton and Ashley Smith were seeded 10th after three rounds of argument. They advanced to the fourth round but faced a tough bench. They lost that round to one of the top four teams from the regional. However, their brief was named the fourth best in the competition. Anjali Sharma and Adam Woodside presented outstanding oral arguments in their three rounds, often facing tough questions from an engaged bench. They kept their composure throughout, achieving commendable oral argument scores.

Both teams were assisted by practitioner coaches Elleny Christopolous, Kate Maternowski, and Zachary Willenbrink (L’11). Congratulations to team members for their outstanding representation of Marquette Law.