2015 News

  • 07.19.15
    Faculty & Staff
    Chippewas Herald
    Janine Geske, trustee and retired professor of law, commented on the John Doe ruling by the Wisconsin Supreme Court fueling a call to punish prosecutors. Geske said she saw no basis for disciplining John Doe prosecutors because it was unreasonable to expect them to know in 2012 that the Supreme Court this year would narrow the definition of what constitutes illegal campaign coordination. "To me, it's a threat that ‘if you mess with us, we're going to take your livelihood away.'"
  • 07.15.15
    Faculty & Staff
    Fox 6
    Matt Parlow, associate dean for academic affairs and professor of law, commented on the rarity of ticket surcharge fees. The latest state proposal to help fund a new downtown arena includes a ticket surcharge fee. "Often times the tenant, particularly, the pro sports team, doesn't like them because for every dollar that gets added as a tax, that's one less dollar they can charge for tickets."
  • 06.10.15
    Faculty & Staff
    JSOnline
    That was the title of the speech that Law School Dean Joseph Kearney delivered Thursday to the Western District of Wisconsin Bar Association. An audience that included one member of the court, Chief Justice Patience Roggensack, listened to Kearney argue for taking some of the politics out of the court by allowing jurists to be elected only to a single 16-year term, rather than multiple terms of 10 years. "No one can reasonably maintain that today's court enjoys the basic collegiality that not only is a happy incident to, but is an important enabling component of, a law-declaring...
  • 05.19.15
    Faculty & Staff
    Chronicle of Higher Ed
    Matt Mitten, director of the National Sports Law Institute, commented on the idea of a presidential commission on college sports. Mitten said a commission would go a long way toward resolving claims that athletes are being exploited because it would provide a formal process for all stakeholders to propose new measures.
  • 04.29.15
    Faculty & Staff
    Bloomberg.com
    Nadelle Grossman, professor of law, discussed on Bloomberg Radio the implications of ESPN’s lawsuit against Verizon Communications, alleging breach of contract due to Verizon’s new "Custom TV" packages.
  • 04.12.15
    Marquette Lawyers
    Milwaukee Public Radio
    It’s not often that the wheels of military justice turn outside of military courts. And it’s even less often that the public can watch the proceedings. But thanks to the judicial outreach program of the US Court of Appeals for the Armed Forces, their courtroom is open to any interested party tomorrow in Milwaukee. "This gives the public, including the law students, an opportunity to at least see the appellate stage of a court martial," says Marquette Law Professor Scott Idleman.
  • 04.12.15
    Faculty & Staff
    Milwaukee Public Radio
    It’s not often that the wheels of military justice turn outside of military courts. And it’s even less often that the public can watch the proceedings. But thanks to the judicial outreach program of the US Court of Appeals for the Armed Forces, their courtroom is open to any interested party tomorrow in Milwaukee. "This gives the public, including the law students, an opportunity to at least see the appellate stage of a court martial," says Marquette Law Professor Scott Idleman.
  • 02.02.15
    Faculty & Staff
    Wisconsin Radio Network
    Charles Franklin, professor of law and public policy and director of the Marquette Law School Poll, previewed Gov. Scott Walker's state budget address. Franklin commented on Walker's plans to fund a new Milwaukee Bucks arena but cut funding for the University of Wisconsin education system. Franklin predicted that health care bills will increase substantially in the next two years.
  • 01.21.15
    Faculty & Staff
    Yahoo
    Paul Secunda, professor of law, commented on Gov. Scott Walker's upcoming budget proposal, which will require drug testing of recipients of Medicaid, food stamps and jobless benefits. The proposal will ban drug users from receiving aid. "Because the proposal targets a broad range of programs - and would require modifying federal rules on Medicaid eligibility - it will face challenges either from the Obama administration or rights groups like the American Civil Liberties Union," said Secunda.